Author Topic: New topic Photos  (Read 126476 times)

November 17, 2018, 01:06 PM
Reply #200
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Tonight, I'm going to tell you why you shouldn't take your car tonight if you are in France.

Nowadays, we can see protests in many countries, and for various reasons. In Pakistan, some Islamists took to the streets because Asia Bibi was drinking the water of the wrong well. Apparently the water, or the well, or probably both of them, belonged to the Muslims. It sparked weeks, if not years, of demonstrations.
Today, some similar demonstrations took place in France. The word revolt seems more appropriate. I would even use the French word "Jacquerie", used to depict the peasant uprisings, especially during the revolution of 1789. I wanted to buy a pizza tonight and I knew this would be difficult to go out with all those demonstrators blocking the road. I've not been disappointed. The roundabout near the cours Fauriel in Saint Etienne was totally blocked. And I still have a matriculation with the number 75, being a foreigner would make things more difficult. To go back, and avoid the filtering road block, well, I just took the same road...on the wrong side of the road for about 50 meters.
humbert and panzer24 must be wondering why demonstrators were blocking the traffic. Actually they are protesting against higher fuel prices, and demand a better tax justice.
If you want to know more: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/11/17/one-killed-16-injured-yellow-jackets-protests-rising-fuel-prices/

A car forces a dam as protesters wearing yellow vests, a symbol of a French drivers’ protest against higher fuel prices, block a road in Donges.




On the périphérique parisien.
« Last Edit: November 17, 2018, 01:10 PM by scarface »

November 18, 2018, 11:32 AM
Reply #201
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Here are a few unusual photos...


A camel that had escaped from a circus was found wandering on a road in Essonne. It was captured by the firefighters of the department.


shadow.97 or Murtlap must be wondering: Is it monsieur baboon? It looks like him, but there is no doubt, he has put on too much weight. Vasudev must be thinking, bullshit! it’s an elephant.
So what is it? Learning again how to walk in a swimming pool: it’s a revolutionary treatment for an elephant tested for the first time in Thailand.


A golden pheasant from Hangzhou safari park in China bore a remarkable resemblance to a certain US president elect.


A cat had its fur trimmed to look like a “stegosaurus spine” at a pet shop in Taiwan.

November 18, 2018, 04:23 PM
Reply #202
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Tonight, I'm going to hold a conference about the demonstration that took place today on the champs Elysées against Apple.



The launch of an Apple store on the Champs Elysees in Paris was greeted Sunday by a protest against the US multinational's controversial fiscal practices.

Activists from the tax campaign group Attac gathered on the famous boulevard, wearing coloured wigs and party hats, throwing confetti and chanting: "Apple, pay your taxes!"

The group had staged a sit-in at Apple's flagship Paris store in December 2017, and in February a French court declined to approve a ban on such actions following a request by the US computer giant.

"We have come to celebrate in our own way the inauguration of Apple's Champs Elysees store, to remind people that Apple is one of the biggest tax evaders in the world," Attac spokeswoman Aurelie Trouve told AFP at the protest, which featured a brass band.

Apple, the first US company to attain one trillion dollars in market capitalisation, grew in part owing "to the fact that it extorts billions of euros from citizens, notably European and French, through fiscal evasion of its profits, first in Ireland and now in Jersey," the spokeswoman said.

Meanwhile security personnel allowed customers to enter the new store to a boisterous welcome by Apple employees.

Attac -- the Association for the Taxation of Financial Transactions and Citizens Action -- criticises French President Emmanuel Macron for failing to tackle multinational tax practices.

French Economy Minister Bruno Le Maire has pushed for a Europe-wide tax policy on computer giants such as Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple but Ireland, which attracts such companies, is opposed while EU heavyweight Germany has voiced only lukewarm support for the French initiative.

Attac staged a sit-in at Apple's flagship Paris store in December 2017, and the US giant lost a legal bid to ban further such protests






November 19, 2018, 05:32 PM
Reply #203
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Here are some old photos that were once available on the forum.
I know that humbert, Daniil, aa1234779 and some users on the forum are looking at them.


Those ones were taken in December 2015 in the 18th arrondissement...












And those ones were taken on August, 10 2016 in the 1st arrondissement





























November 24, 2018, 06:09 PM
Reply #204
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Note that this conference was updated with new photos: http://www.nomaher.com/forum/index.php?topic=2283.msg17240#msg17240

November 28, 2018, 05:07 AM
Reply #205
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I hope that humbert, usman and shadow.97 are fine.
Today I'm in Lyon and it's a bit cold.
https://ibb.co/CmnWZgz

November 29, 2018, 09:17 PM
Reply #206
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I hope that humbert, usman and shadow.97 are fine.
Today I'm in Lyon and it's a bit cold.

I'm fine. A little cooler than usual here but OK. In fact, I'd give anything to live in a place where I would never again have to use air conditioning. I've had the misfortune of living in warm climates most of my life.

Incidentally, I would absolutely love to be able to buy that small car you took a picture of. Sadly it's not available for sale here. Most of these Americans prefer these huge pick up trucks or SUV's, especially here in Texas.

December 10, 2018, 01:29 PM
Reply #207
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I'm fine. A little cooler than usual here but OK. In fact, I'd give anything to live in a place where I would never again have to use air conditioning. I've had the misfortune of living in warm climates most of my life.

Incidentally, I would absolutely love to be able to buy that small car you took a picture of. Sadly it's not available for sale here. Most of these Americans prefer these huge pick up trucks or SUV's, especially here in Texas.
So you are like me, you don't like when it's cold and you don't like when it's too hot either. Then Paris or Saint Etienne are not for you, there is a cold and damp climate in winter, and more and more often there are heatwaves in summer. But maybe you should insulate your house and make it home energy-efficient. In France there are subsidies for thermal insulation work, it's probably the case in the US with a President who cares about its citizen and the environment. For example you need to have stores or shutters that you can close when it's hot.


Now we are going to examine the photo below. And no, It's not the roundabout of happiness in Raqqa.
Actually, This evening, I took this photo, near the commercial center of Monthieu, in Saint Etienne. It closed on Saturday, when the shopkeepers saw a pack of Barbarians with yellow jackets heading towards them. We don't know where these people with yellow vests come from, and apparently some of them are sleeping on this roundabout to defend their ideas, even if temperatures will go below 0ºC this night. Maybe they come from Sweden or Russia, they are not afraid of the cold.
Currently, they are probably eating some saucisson and drinking some mulled wine. And they are waiting some brave people, some leaders like you humbert, to carry through the political revolution and build a more equitable world. And yet, should the leaders of the forum meet them, and I'm thinking about shadow.97, Vasudev, akaubee, shhnedo, iih or Maher, I'm afraid it would result in a cultural shock.
I'm wondering whether aa1234779 is laughing after reading this, or if he finds this pathetic. I don't know myself what to think about the situation.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4r9AWRsVxE

December 10, 2018, 10:41 PM
Reply #208
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So you are like me, you don't like when it's cold and you don't like when it's too hot either. Then Paris or Saint Etienne are not for you, there is a cold and damp climate in winter, and more and more often there are heatwaves in summer. But maybe you should insulate your house and make it home energy-efficient. In France there are subsidies for thermal insulation work, it's probably the case in the US with a President who cares about its citizen and the environment. For example you need to have stores or shutters that you can close when it's hot.

I don't mind the cold, in fact I actually like it. What I can't take is the detestable heat. Unfortunately I've been cursed with having to live in hot climates all my life. I would love to move to Canada if it were possible.

There are still tax credits for energy saving things such as insulation and solar panels. The only problem is that these things aren't cheap. Also I don't make enough money to be benefited by the tax credits.



December 27, 2018, 07:54 PM
Reply #209
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Tonight, I'm going to talk about climate change and the citizens' involvement.



In each country, citizens' action depends on the institutional practice as well as on current events.
For instance, in India, tens of thousands of Indian farmers have marched to the parliament in the capital, Delhi, to highlight the deepening agrarian crisis.
They arrived on Thursday from across the country and held a rally demanding better crop prices, drought relief and loan waivers.
Indian agriculture has been blighted by a depleting water table and declining productivity for decades.
Some "red vests" in India.


In Palestine, Thousands living in the West Bank have been protesting for almost two months to ask the government to pull back on the first ever proposal for social security.




But tonight, I'm going to focus on France. Indeed, Nearly 2 million people signed petition to sue government over climate inaction.

If France isn’t willing to take action on climate change on its own, well, the courts are always an option to force the government’s hand.
More than 1.8 million people worldwide have signed a petition from environmental groups to sue the French government for failing to take sufficient action on the matter. These groups, which include Greenpeace France and Oxfam France, are calling it the case of the century.

They’re hoping to acquire 2 million signatures, but the fact that they haven’t met the goal yet hasn’t stopped them from moving forward with litigation. They formally filed a case on December 17 demanding the government meet the Paris Agreement and the country’s own national energy transition strategy, and alleging that its decades of inaction has led to damages for which the plaintiffs are demanding compensation. French officials have two months to respond.

Hopefully, this move won’t spark the same kind of backlash that previous attempts at climate policy in France have. Just earlier this year, President Emmanuel Macron announced a gas tax to help alleviate emissions from vehicles. In 2017, the country consumed 4.5 percent more fossil fuels than the scheduled target the French government had set out when it launched its energy transition act in 2015 to prevent further global warming.

However, that gas tax failed miserably when violent protests by so-called yellow vests erupted in November. The lower- and middle-class people who largely made up the protesters aren’t against climate action, per se. They’re against climate action that doesn’t consult them to ensure their needs are met. Addressing the needs of a nation’s most vulnerable is a key step in any just transition away from a fossil fuel economy. This is also how a government builds support for its policies, which is key to their success.

The gas tax is on pause, at least for now. But many believe the French government still needs to act, with 2018 ending as the country’s hottest year on record. Pollution from vehicles, industry, and agriculture results in 48,o00 deaths a year in France, according to a 2016 study. France’s former ecology minister quit on live radio in August because of his people’s failure to do anything about any of it.

So now people are turning to the courts. And they’ve seen success in the past. In the United States, children in Massachusetts won a case to get their state government to develop a climate plan. Our Children’s Trust, the organization that supported them, is also behind a federal lawsuit that’s still moving through the courts. In Colombia, similar litigation resulted in legal personhood for the country’s piece of the Amazon Rainforest in April. In 2015, the Netherlands was the first country where a judge ruled on the side of citizens and environmental organizations, mandating the government to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. That decision was upheld earlier this year.

Sometimes, legal action does work. At the very least, it pressures governments to acknowledge climate change exists. Well, most governments, that is.


Thousands march in Paris against climate change, on 8 December 2018.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2018, 07:57 PM by scarface »