Author Topic: New topic Photos  (Read 124835 times)

September 03, 2018, 03:30 PM
Reply #160
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I'm browsing the forum and I noticed that Maher hasn't logged into the forum for ages. He must be tired.

Tonight I was reading some news on le figaro and other websites. And I found this article: https://www.letemps.ch/societe/bureau-tyrannie-cool
Then I was thinking about aa1234779 who told us a few months ago that he was unemployed. But if you read the article, you will learn that unemployment is a new kind of liberty. Just think how happy aa1234779 is. I wish I were with users of the forum in a farm in Palestine, far away from civilization. We could play tennis and drink orange juice every day.



A photo of st etienne. where I live, in a park, far away from civilization.

September 04, 2018, 06:37 AM
Reply #161
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here is another photo.
we can see a rooster in the foreground.
Vasudev and usmangujjar must be wondering if it's monsieur baboon in the background, on top of the hill. Actually, it seems it's monsieur Christ who is hiding over there.


« Last Edit: September 04, 2018, 01:44 PM by scarface »

September 04, 2018, 01:43 PM
Reply #162
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a few days ago aa1234779 was asking for new photos. And I know that he is looking at them with great attention. Maybe some other users are looking at them too.


Here we have two photos taken place des ursules in St Etienne.

On the foreground, those young people seem to be outsiders, drinking beers and smoking. We can't see it here, but half of the shops are closed, even in the center of the town. Saint Etienne is a town that was devastated by the closure of coal mines. And it's still the case. Since 1970, it lost 25% of its population. Now the population has stabilized at about 170 000.
I was looking for some Chinese spring rolls, but I've been unable to find this kind of shop in the center of the town. Where I was living in the 17th arrondissement I was spoilt for choices when it came to dining.
But unlike Paris which is cloudy most of the time, the weather was fine and we have a sunny day.


Some young asian girls. I must say there are more Muslim people in the streets, and Maher would be surprised because there are many kebab shops. Unfortunately, I'm not a fan of "junk food". On the wall, a weird graffiti.




Note that I found a code to use the internet connection of the neighbor.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2018, 01:50 PM by scarface »

September 05, 2018, 05:38 AM
Reply #163
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Here is another photo, taken in a park in St etienne. The environment is restful. We don't hear the sounds of the birds but there are a few pigeons. The Parisian frenzy doesn't seem to exist here, but the noises of the cars are spoiling this subtle harmony.
https://i.imgur.com/7bnI7KA.jpg

I hope aa1234779 and usman are enjoying the photos.

September 08, 2018, 01:01 PM
Reply #164
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Tonight, I'm going to talk about the international day of protests that took place today.

These protests over climate change kicked off in dozens of cities around the world Saturday, as key UN talks aimed at breathing fresh life into the Paris Agreement took place in Bangkok.
As global warming races ahead of efforts to contain it, the discussions are deadlocked over a number of contentious issues, with activists demanding immediate action to prevent irreparable damage to the planet.

The "Rise for Climate" protest movement, which has organised events in dozens of countries on Saturday, wants governments to end their reliance on fossil fuels and transition fully into renewable energy.

Beginning in Australia, a tall ship moved through Sydney Harbour in front of the Opera House as activists on board held up protest signs.
Its billowing sails featured banners that read "Rise for Climate; Action with 350" – referring to environment advocacy group 350, which spearheaded the global protest.

In Paris, the protests looked set to have renewed momentum this year, FRANCE 24’s Chris Moore reported from City Hall in central Paris.


“There is a healthy turnout today,” said Moore, as thousands of people waving banners and clapping hands marched in the background.
Some 20,000 people responded to an appeal on Facebook, launched by a man called Maxime Lelong who described himself as an "ordinary concerned citizen", saying they would attend Saturday’s protests.

Lelong’s appeal came in the wake of the resignation of France’s popular environment minister and celebrity green campaigner, Nicolas Hulot, who quit his role last month, accusing the French government of only taking baby steps in the fight against climate change.

Hulot’s appointment was a coup for French President Emmanuel Macron – Hulot had declined to serve under previous French presidents – but his public resignation on live radio at the end of August dealt a damaging blow to the Macron government’s green credentials.

NGOs and organisers of Saturday’s events in Paris stress that it is not about supporting one politician or another, Moore added, it’s really about honouring the words that Hulot gave when he resigned.

‘In an era of [Donald] Trump,’ Hulot said, ‘many people are simply resigned to their fate on climate change. That’s the absolute opposite of what we need. The organisers want a big turn out on the streets of France to show that the general public haven’t forgotten that this is a pressing concern.

In the Thai capital, some 200 protesters assembled in front of the UN regional headquarters, where delegates were discussing how to implement measures agreed by world powers under the 2015 Paris Accord on climate change.

The talks aim to create a draft legal framework for limiting global temperature rises that can be presented to ministers and heads of state at a final round of discussions in Poland in December.

The delegates have been meeting since Tuesday, but have made little progress, according to multiple sources close to the negotiations.

"The negotiators are not taking any action," Ruchi Tripathi, head of climate justice at charity ActionAid, told AFP.

In particular, the issue of how the fight against climate change will be funded – and how that funding is made available to developing nations – remains a key sticking point.

Dozens of labourers and fishermen from the Gulf of Thailand, whose livelihoods are threatened by rising sea levels and coastal erosion caused by climate change, joined Saturday's protest.

Many brought examples of their produce, including crabs and shrimp, and held banners demanding that delegates take action.

"I came here today to ask the government to put coastal erosion on the national agenda," 58-year-old fisherwoman Aree Kongklad told AFP.

She said that the mangrove forests near her coastal home had been destroyed, jeopardising the supply of crabs that are her livelihood.

In Manila, more than 800 people, including one dressed as a Tyrannosaurus rex holding a "Go Fossil Free" sign, marched through the streets protesting the country's heavy reliance on coal.

Along with Bangkok, the Philippine capital is projected to be among the world's hardest hit urban areas by climate change impacts.

"We are among the most vulnerable and we are among those still stuck in an energy system that is backwards," campaigner Chuck Baclavon told AFP, adding that the government is out of excuses.

The country has been the victim of powerful weather phenomenons like Typhoon Haiyan, a deadly superstorm that left more than 7,350 people dead or missing across central Philippines in November 2013.

September 10, 2018, 11:23 AM
Reply #165
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A few days ago, Hundreds of thousands of climate change protestors gathered at some 850 events across 90 countries – and seven continents – in what is one of the biggest ever days of global action highlighting the issue.
They are marching in cities from Kathmandu to Copenhagen, Lagos to Lisbon, Bogota to Berlin. They are asking politicians to do something to curb climate change.

Here are a few photos.


Here in Sydney, Australia


Members of The Forgotten Solution NGO, disguised as trees, demonstrate in front of the San Francisco City Hall on September 8th.


In Brussels, a rally organized in front of the European Parliament Saturday gathered about a thousand people according to the organizers


Events took place even in Marseille, where 2,500 people marched according to the organizers, and 700 according to the police.


In Paris, 20 thousand people met and responded to a call for mobilization launched on social networks. Maybe some of you recognized the building in the background (it's Notre dame Cathedral).


In Nairobi


In Bangkok, nearly 200 protesters gathered in front of the UN regional headquarters, where a preparatory meeting for the upcoming COP24 climate summit, scheduled for Poland in three months, was organized until Sunday.


Thousands of protesters gathered in the streets of San Francisco, including indigenous advocates.


This day of action, here in Kathmandu, Nepal, is supposed to culminate with a big demonstration in San Francisco, where will be held from September 12 the World Summit of cities and companies for the climate, organized by the governor of California in answer to Trump's anti-ecological policy.



September 14, 2018, 05:44 AM
Reply #166
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Here are a fem photos for the users of the forum. I know that aa1234779 is waiting for them.

From the observatory park of Meudon


Paris on 14 July 2018


La défense from Saint Cloud


A view from Issy les Moulineaux


Lyon by night


San Francisco early in the morning




If you can, avoid those big towns, which ar heavily dependent on oil. Smaller towns usually require less energy and less complex logistics.


The following are some pictures taken in Qalqilya Zoo (not taken by me). This zoo is a bit unique since the zoo is more or less without living animals. The majority of animals had died from fright and lack of proper care as a result of continuous incursions into the town by the Israeli Defence Force. The zookeeper was forced to become taxidermist but with little experience this often resulted in tragi-comic results.





In the East of Palestine, people are using camels instead of cars.

« Last Edit: September 14, 2018, 05:48 AM by scarface »

September 14, 2018, 06:01 AM
Reply #167
scar, have you taken these pictures with a camera, phone or something else?
The light in the pictures is usually quite good.

I thought of uploading some pictures.
Where do you host them?

September 14, 2018, 06:19 AM
Reply #168
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scar, have you taken these pictures with a camera, phone or something else?
The light in the pictures is usually quite good.

I thought of uploading some pictures.
Where do you host them?

Actually none of these photos were taken by me. It was the guy who was working next to me who took them, with a camera. My phone has a 16M pixels camera, and yet the results would have been sensibly more blurred. That's why I practically never took photos of landscapes. You can see that in this topic.
One day he brought his camera and he had a lens like this...https://preview.ibb.co/gbBHKp/LD0004628401_2.jpg
I didn't ask him if I could take his photos though. But probably he wouldn't care, and I didn't see him on the forum (I didn't talk about it either, after all there are sensible stuff that only a few users and humbert, usman, Maher, I and you are allowed to see).
If you want the photos they are available here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/49511298@N04/ (I'll remove the link later).

September 15, 2018, 11:03 PM
Reply #169
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The following are some pictures taken in Qalqilya Zoo (not taken by me). This zoo is a bit unique since the zoo is more or less without living animals. The majority of animals had died from fright and lack of proper care as a result of continuous incursions into the town by the Israeli Defence Force.


Lack of proper care makes sense. According to Maher, the statement about continuous incursions into Qalqilya by the IDF is inaccurate. He tells me that rarely do people who live in Qalqilya ever see Israeli soldiers. If they come it's very brief (e.g., to take away a suspected terrorist) and they're gone almost immediately. All police work is done by the Palestinian police. This is essentially the agreement signed some 20 years ago by Yassir Arafat and Yitzak Rabin.