Author Topic: What kind of meat it is  (Read 6363 times)

March 27, 2019, 04:32 PM
Reply #40
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Actually, I'm going to explain the main thesis of Olaf about Islam, which is quite interesting. Of course, it subject of disagreement.

Very intrigued by Islam, Olaf (a nickname) sought to know it. During his reading of the Qur'an, the biography of Muhammad (Ibn Hicham's sira), the discovery of Islamic discourse and discussions with Muslims, he could not prevent the rise of a feeling of unease and misunderstanding of this religion as he discovered what was for him contradictions. To try to explain them, he wanted to learn more about the historical origins of Islam.

Thus he discovered the work of Father Edouard-Marie Gallez, Doctor of Theology and History of Religions, and met him. His thesis, titled The Messiah and His Prophet and our Exchanges made him discover a lot of exciting historical research. Like everyone else, Olaf had learnt Muslim history at school, the story of a desert prophet who transformed the world through the revelation of the Qur'an. The reading of "Al-sīra", the Islamic biography of Muhammad, had already relativized this soft version of a preacher of peace. But this research has transformed his vision of Islam, revealing him a different story than the ambient discourse wants to make believe: Islam is not the result of a divine revelation - or the mere preaching of Muhammad - but that of a very long and very complex process of rewriting history, rooted in some of the denatured Jewish and Christian ideas that prevailed in late-6th-century Syria (what scholars call "the Late Antiquity"), a process manipulated by the first Muslim rulers to satisfy their aims of political domination.

This discovery remained to this day almost unknown to the public. The fault probably lies in the complexity of the subject and its very sensitive nature, which has confined it to narrow circles of research. How then to make it accessible to the greatest number? This is what Olaf hopes to contribute with the Great Secret of Islam, fruit of a long personal work and his collaboration with Edouard-Marie Gallez. This little book presents itself as a historical perspective and a development of the main results achieved by this researcher, based on the work of the impressive cohort of researchers on which it is based.

March 28, 2019, 02:52 PM
Reply #41
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Note that the recipe of the squid and beans with shallot and white wine sauce will take place during the week end.
First photo here:

April 06, 2019, 08:35 AM
Reply #42
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Today, I'm going to disclose the recipe of the gratin dauphinois with pure pork saucisson in a white wine sauce.


In a large nonstick pan, heat butter over medium heat with white wine. Add potatoes and shallot; cook and stir 20 minutes.


If there is no more wine, don’t hesitate to put more in.


When it’s ready add grated gruyere cheese on the sauteed potatoes, and arrange the slices of saucisson. The pure pork saucisson must be French, if you see EU on the package without other indication, it means that it’s probably old pork meat coming from Poland or Bulgaria. If you don’t like saucisson, you can put some Italian coppa or some high quality lomo embuchado from Spain (which is cured pork tenderloin left whole and virtually untouched in the curing process).



Note that if you want this recipe to become a bit more Islamic, you can replace the pork meat with the camel meat of aa1234779.

April 11, 2019, 11:15 AM
Reply #43
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I see that panzer24 is on the forum. I was thinking about him since I'm going to disclose the recipe of the couscous.
I was thinking he was English or Swedish because he speaks English very well, but maybe it's a cliché since he told us he was from Tunisia.

April 12, 2019, 09:44 PM
Reply #44
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Today, I'm going to disclose the recipe of the gratin dauphinois with pure pork saucisson in a white wine sauce.

That small gas stove you have. How does it ignite the gas? Do you have to use a match, or does it have some sort of pilot like a water heater?



April 13, 2019, 05:41 AM
Reply #45
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Quote from: humbert link=topic=3197.msg30230#msg30230
That small gas stove you have. How does it ignite the gas? Do you have to use a match, or does it have some sort of pilot like a water heater?
Actually, it does not require matches, it's an auto-ignition gas stove, an electronic lighter is integrated in the burner setup.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2019, 06:23 PM by scarface »

April 13, 2019, 05:44 AM
Reply #46
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Tonight, I’m going to disclose the recipe of the couscous. Panzer24 and aa1234779 probably know it already. But cooking a good couscous is a task that shoud not be taken lightly.

Couscous is a North African dish made from tiny steamed balls of semolina flour. Though we think of it and cook it as a grain, couscous is actually a type of pasta.
First and foremost, bring the cooking liquid to a boil in a medium pot. Add a drizzle of olive oil, a pad of butter, and a little salt. Then add the couscous.


Take the pan off the heat, cover, and let the couscous steam for 5 minutes.
When you lift the lid, the grains will appear flat in an even layer. Use a fork to fluff it up and break up the clumps for light and fluffy couscous.


Now heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil to pan. Pour the side dish into the skillet; cook a few minutes or until done.


When it’s over, you can also pour some lemon juice on the couscous. Then you can mix the side dish with it.


For the wine, I recommend a Boulaouane bottle, a red wine from Morocco. Morocco is considered to have the best natural potential for producing quality wines, due to its high mountains and cooling influence of the Atlantic, as these factors offset the risk of having too hot vineyards.

April 14, 2019, 10:15 PM
Reply #47
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Seems like an awful lot of food for just you. Are you living alone or do you have a visitor?

April 15, 2019, 06:22 AM
Reply #48
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Seems like an awful lot of food for just you. Are you living alone or do you have a visitor?
It's a good question indeed. As far as this dish is concerned, I ate it alone. Maher and aa1234779 were not here. Had it not been for the forum, I would not have prepared this enormous meal. Note that I don't eat usually much at noon.
today: http://imgur.com/a/MNQhQY3
In my opinion this couscous is a dietary meal, enhanced by quality wine, and it's probably healthier than a mcdonald.

April 15, 2019, 12:40 PM
Reply #49
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in terms of calories, we must recognize that humbert is right, it's not healthy to eat a big couscous every day. At least not that big. If I did that, I would end up like monsieur gorilla.
I calculated that the couscous above contained roughly 1100 calories. But for somebody who is playing a sport, it's just half of the daily caloric needs.
Now let's see the calories in the mcdonald's "burgers".

The small hamburger

254 Calories.

The Filet-o-fish

333 Calories

The Maestro glorious giorgio

762 Calories

Well, I'm not sure that you can find the small burger in the USA. But now if you take a supersize menu, things are different:
First, the drink. A Supersize Coke comes in a 42-ounce cup (1.25 liter!) and, according to McDonald's, is supposed to contain 410 calories.
Now for the french fries: The Supersize serving, according to McDonald's' own guidelines, is supposed to be 7 ounces and contain 610 calories and 29 grams of fat -- or about half of your daily recommended fat intake. The "large" is less than 1 ounce smaller -- 6.2 ounces -- and contains 540 calories and 26 grams of fat.
Now for the burger: What about the Double Quarter Pounder with cheese, which contains 770 calories and 47 grams of fat? Or the Spanish Omelette Bagel, which has 710 calories and 40 grams of fat?
If we are totalling the number of calories, the menu is reaching 410+610+770=1790 calories. I guess that humbert or aa1234779 are not eating mcdonald's supersize menu every day. They would be at the Pere Lachaise otherwise.