Maher's Digital World

Documentaries

Re: Documentaries
« Reply #20 on: August 30, 2017, 09:22 PM »
As to Humbert's question, I'm from the Middle East.  :'(

Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him) said “Surah (chapter of) Hud and its sisters turned my hair gray"

Hud (11)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiqxo4UDVfU

Offline humbert

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Re: Documentaries
« Reply #21 on: September 03, 2017, 11:10 PM »
As to Humbert's question, I'm from the Middle East.  :'(

Given this information, is it safe to rule out Israel as a possible candidate of where you live? :)

Is Arabic the official language of your country?

Finally, do you have a beard?

Offline scarface

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Re: Documentaries
« Reply #22 on: September 04, 2017, 04:12 PM »
Well, tonight I'm going to hold a conference about the Middle East. But I'm not going to talk about religion, you have enough knowledge about it.
Instead, I'm going to talk about unemployment.

In most places a large youthful population would be regarded as an economic blessing. But in the Arab world the young are treated, for the most part, as a curse to be suppressed. Faced with oppression and few opportunities, the region’s youth is wasting away.

Here is an interesting chart:


The Arab world is growing fast, and the number of young workers, aged 15-24, will grow to 58 million in 2025. In the largest Gulf state, Saudi Arabia, about 70% of working people are employed in the public sector. According to Jadwa Investment, a Saudi research firm, the working-age population is expected to increase to nearly 18 million by 2025, meaning 226,000 Saudis will enter the labor force each year. The public sector simply cannot absorb all of them.



And in the context of a sharp decline in oil prices over the past 15 months, unemployment levels in the oil-exporting countries in the region, including the GCC, are expected to surge as governments are poised to cut spending to cope with rising fiscal deficits, according to the latest regional economic outlook of the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

Clearly, the private sector will have to take over from the public sector as the main source of job creation. However, the expansion of the private sector and the diversification away from oil that are needed to absorb the growing workforce have so far proven elusive. Though some progress has been made, most economies in the region are still deeply dependent on the capital-intensive hydrocarbon sector, which generates limited direct employment.

Re: Documentaries
« Reply #23 on: September 09, 2017, 05:37 PM »
The problem with the world today is people think great numbers of people is not a plus for any certain country. Human resource is more important than any other resource if invested in and managed properly.
Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him) said “Surah (chapter of) Hud and its sisters turned my hair gray"

Hud (11)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiqxo4UDVfU

Offline scarface

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Re: Documentaries
« Reply #24 on: September 12, 2017, 10:30 AM »
Tonight, I’m going to show you a disquieting photo. Maher must be wondering if the scene is taking place in Palestine. Actually, it’s not the case, the photo was taken today in Paris.


Indeed, The Parisian demonstration against the reform of the labor code gathered 24,000 people on Tuesday, according to the prefecture of police. The CGT, meanwhile, estimated that 60,000 demonstrators participated in the parade in the capital, speaking of "very strong" social mobilization.
After the province this morning, the Parisian demonstration started around 2 pm. The police headquarters spotted "about 300 hooded people" behind the head of the procession. The first tensions broke out in the middle of the afternoon.

Offline scarface

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Re: Documentaries
« Reply #25 on: September 17, 2017, 11:39 AM »
Tonight, I'm going to hold a conference to talk about the forests of the world.


Deforestation: Anatomy of an announced disaster.

Each year, 13 million hectares of forests vanish around the world, the equivalent of four times the area of Belgium. If intensive agriculture, urbanization and the timber trade are the main factors, other causes are to be explored. This phenomenon in sharp progression is likely to have irreversible consequences.

Forty football fields. It is the area that forests lose every minute around the world. This net loss represents more than 13 million hectares per year, according to FAO (the UN Food and Agriculture Organization). It is the equivalent of the area of England, or a quarter of France, gone up in firewood, transformed into plantations or left in grazing ground for livestock.

A daunting figure. Especially when compared to the forest resources on Earth. In total, four billion hectares are now occupied by forests (see maps below). While boreal and temperate forests have increased slightly in recent years, particularly in China and the West, tropical areas - 1.6 billion hectares - have been declining steadily for the past 50 years. These massifs are the richest, the most fragile and, therefore, the most threatened. At current rates, tropical forests are projected to disappear within 50-70 years.

While eleven flanks of deforestation are listed by NGOs worldwide, three are of real concern: the Amazon, particularly in Brazil, Central and Southeast Asia, mainly Indonesia and Malaysia. These three zones represent the main tropical forests in the world, and form a "green belt" around the Earth. In the future, experts predict that 80% of deforestation will take place in these less and less isolated areas. Only this phenomenon is difficult to apprehend. It is not a crude process that applies equally to different countries. It takes different forms: social, economic, industrial. It is undoubtedly this polymorphy which makes this extractivism - the means and strategies for the industrial exploitation of nature by man - so difficult to control because it does not call for uniform measures to regulate it.

Today, deforestation is responsible for 20 to 25% of the world's greenhouse gas emissions, the main causes of global warming. More precisely, the destruction of the rainforest causes each year more emission into the atmosphere than the entire transport sector in the world. In southern countries - which deforest more than northern countries since 1990 - 35% of greenhouse gas emissions are due to deforestation. This figure even reaches 65% in the poorest regions.

Evolution of forests between 1990 and 2015 in the world


If the collective imagination would gladly make the timber trade the main cause of deforestation, this is not the case. The major actor of this phenomenon is agriculture, responsible for 80% of the deforestation in the tropical areas. Agricultural activity can take different forms: breeding, soya and palm oil cultivation, rubber.... The illegal timber market also has its share of responsibility. It is a triggering factor, and feeds on other activities. While each region has its own specificities, the intrusion of humans into primary forests also has a non-negligible social aspect.

The Amazon, an essential but abused lung.

An area of the Amazonian forest turned into a desert illegally by mining companies.

Nestled in the heart of South America, the Amazon is a natural treasure of more than 500 million hectares. It is the largest tropical forest in the world. Swept by the Atlantic wind, the green expanse seems to be abutting against the Andes, which limits the expansion of this "lung" essential to the planet's ecosystem. But the Amazon is in danger. The main area affected by deforestation in terms of deforested volume has lost nearly 20% of its area since 1970, and forecasts point to a loss of 70% by 2050. The main threat comes from Brazil, the greater part of this primary forest where nearly 390 billion trees live from 16,000 different species. In 2010, a WWF report showed that 1,200 new species were discovered in the Amazon rainforest between 1999 and 2009, including 637 plants, 257 fish, 216 amphibians, 55 reptiles, 16 birds and 39 mammals

Monsieur bonobo

« Last Edit: April 13, 2019, 09:52 AM by scarface »

Offline scarface

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Re: Documentaries
« Reply #26 on: September 18, 2017, 04:13 PM »
Tonight, I'm going to ask a few questions to aa1234779.
After you disappeared, I didn't know if you were going to come back. I thought you had gone (how long did you leave? maybe for 2 years?) And for those who did not read this thread, we learnt you were unemployed.
You know, when you have a job you become a modern-day slave. That's why I suggested you should be doing what you like if you can. But for most people and probably for you, living without money is not possible, that's why getting a job is required to meet one's basic needs. If you don't have skills, maybe you should consider doing manual work (garbage collector, baker, or ever ... executioner !?). You can talk here about your difficulties, and what you think.
Note that the humbert still have unresolved questions. Maybe it's difficult to say whether you have a beard or not (in the avatar below, the answer seems obvious though).
« Last Edit: September 18, 2017, 04:16 PM by scarface »

Re: Documentaries
« Reply #27 on: September 19, 2017, 06:30 PM »
Quote
Tonight, I'm going to ask a few questions to aa1234779.
After you disappeared, I didn't know if you were going to come back. I thought you had gone (how long did you leave? maybe for 2 years?) And for those who did not read this thread, we learnt you were unemployed.
You know, when you have a job you become a modern-day slave. That's why I suggested you should be doing what you like if you can. But for most people and probably for you, living without money is not possible, that's why getting a job is required to meet one's basic needs. If you don't have skills, maybe you should consider doing manual work (garbage collector, baker, or ever ... executioner !?). You can talk here about your difficulties, and what you think.
Note that the humbert still have unresolved questions. Maybe it's difficult to say whether you have a beard or not (in the avatar below, the answer seems obvious though).
Yes it was a bit more than two years. We are all modern-day slaves whether employed or not, like or dislike it. We are all trapped in a system that doesn't seem to work very well in relation to the problems we face as a race.
I'll hopefully find an office job in the coming months. There is nothing wrong with manual work, but executioner. OMG. I don't believe there are vacancies in that area of work as it pays very well those who are willing to take such opportunities. Not me though.
I don't have a beard and no mustache. But even if that were to be, it shouldn't make a difference at all. At the end, we are all human.
Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him) said “Surah (chapter of) Hud and its sisters turned my hair gray"

Hud (11)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiqxo4UDVfU

Offline scarface

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Re: Documentaries
« Reply #28 on: September 20, 2017, 11:57 AM »
The answer of aa1234779 is interesting. In spite of his whereabouts, he does not wear a long beard. Maybe he does not need that though, he's already living in a region where his prophet used to do miracles, a long time ago. I might still be hearing the whispers of God sometimes. Note that it's not the case for Maher. But I assume that wearing a beard is more fashionable in the Syro-Palestinian region, even if  it's popular in Gulf nations.
Actually, if we take the example of Algeria, In the 1960s and 70s, the beard was mainly worn by far-left sympathisers. It was often long and untrimmed. At the end of the 1970s, with the advent of Islamist ideology, more and more men started to wear one as well because the Prophet Mohammad wore one, and they wanted to do the same as him. On this issue, the Ulama (Muslim legal scholars) are divided. Some say wearing a beard is not a religious obligation, arguing that the Prophet wore it simply because it was the norm at the time.

Offline humbert

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Re: Documentaries
« Reply #29 on: September 22, 2017, 09:37 PM »
aa1234779 -> Whether or not you have any kind of facial hair is, as you said, essentially meaningless. The question was based on curiosity since, for some reason, many Muslims wear them. Scarface said (or so I understand) that in many variants of Islam it's not mandatory but done only to emulate Mohammed. ISIS doesn't allow men to shave. I was under the impression this was also the case in Saudi Arabia. That is, of course, until I saw Adel bin Ahmed Al-Jubeir (Saudi foreign minister) on TV.

I wonder how much money do executioners make? For example, that guy who chops off heads in Saudi Arabia on Friday. I assume he gets paid by the number of heads he cuts off.