Maher's Digital World

Documentaries

Offline scarface

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Re: Documentaries
« Reply #190 on: May 28, 2019, 05:20 PM »
You didn't leave Paris yet? Maybe you should, at least if you are a driver.



In 2014, the speed limit on the Parisian Ring road was reduced from 80km/h to 70km/h. Like humbert or Maher, I used to drive on the Parisian ring road at 70 km per hour, but it seems the Mayor of the town wants to limit the speed to 50km/h now.
An interesting article is available here: https://www.citylab.com/transportation/2019/05/paris-beltway-speed-limit-traffic-congestion-lane-removal/590362/


And here is a video of Ghost rider, a swedish biker. (No, It's not Mr baboon on the motorbike). It's a new record for the tour of the périphérique, with an average speed of 210 km/h, after the record of the black prince in the 80's.
Note that this record was made in 2004, at this time there was no radar on the road.
I advise you not to try this at home. If Vasudev is hitting a cow at 200km/h, there is no more cow and no more motorbike.
https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2kce7
« Last Edit: May 28, 2019, 05:40 PM by scarface »

Offline scarface

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Re: Documentaries
« Reply #191 on: June 08, 2019, 11:04 AM »
Today, I'm going to hold a conference about climate change.


America's biggest cities could avoid hundreds of deaths during future heat waves if the world reduces its greenhouse gas emissions enough to meet the Paris climate agreement goals, a new study shows.


A groundskeeper in Los Angeles sweats through another heat wave. A new study looked at what rising global temperatures will mean for heat wave deaths there and other major U.S. cities, including Miami, Chicago and Detroit

Even half a degree warming matters. A new study shows how meeting the Paris climate agreement goals would make a difference in lives saved or lost.


"At the path we are on, toward 3 degrees Celsius warming, we get into temperatures that people have not previously experienced," said Peter Frumhoff, director of science and policy and chief climate scientist at the Union of Concerned Scientists and a co-author of the study published Wednesday in Science Advances. "The core point is, across these cities, thousands of deaths can be avoided by keeping temperatures within the Paris target."


The scientists used detailed data on the deaths that occurred during past heat waves in 15 major U.S. cities, then applied climate models to show what future extreme heat waves would look like as global temperatures rise.

They compared three scenarios: If countries meet their Paris climate pledges, expected to result in about 3 degrees Celsius (5.4°F) of warming this century compared to pre-industrial times; if global warming is instead kept to 2°C; and if countries are able to cut greenhouse gas emissions enough to keep warming to 1.5°C.

With each of those baselines, they explored what temperatures would do to people in the kind of extreme heat wave expected to occur two to three times in a person's lifetime.

"Rising global temperatures mean more people in major U.S. cities will be exposed to extreme heat, and more heat-related deaths will occur. This is relevant to climate policy, especially with the next round of climate pledges taking place in 2020," said University of Bristol climate researcher Eunice Lo, lead author of the study. "This shows the substantial public health benefits of reaching the Paris goal."



Cities vary in their vulnerability to extreme heat for several reasons. Demographics, such as age and poverty, can mean a larger percentage of the population is at risk. Miami, for example, has a large proportion of elderly residents.

Some of the cities are also warming faster than the global average. And dense cities often have a stronger urban heat island effects.

How well the city is prepared also has an effect on survival rates. For the comparison, the study didn't factor in future changes in population, and cities might develop adaptation plans as the heat rises.


Offline scarface

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Re: Documentaries
« Reply #192 on: June 17, 2019, 01:59 PM »
For those who are in the organisation of the Muslim brotherhood on the forum it’s a day of mourning.

Indeed, Egypt’s ousted president Mohamed Morsi has collapsed during a court session and died, almost six years after he was forced from power in a bloody coup.



Morsi, 67, was attending a session in his trial on espionage charges on Monday when he blacked out and then died, according to state media.
“He asked the judge to speak, and was allowed. After the case was adjourned, he fainted and died. His body was then transferred to the hospital,” reported the Egyptian state newspaper al-Ahram, referring to Morsi’s retrial for allegedly spying for the Palestinian Islamist organisation Hamas.
Morsi became president in 2012, following Egypt’s first and only free elections after the dictator Hosni Mubarak was forced from power. He won 51.7% of the vote and his rule marked the peak of power for Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood, which had functioned for decades as an underground political organisation.
But his time in power was cut short a year later as demonstrators once again took to the streets – this time to protest against Morsi’s rule. Egypt’s military seized power in a coup days later on 3 July 2013, bringing the then defence minister, Abdel-Fatah al-Sisi, to power.



As president, Sisi has overseen an extensive crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood and anyone suspected of supporting the group, which Egypt now considers a terrorist organisation.
Morsi was arrested after the 2013 coup and has faced trial on three separate counts of leaking state secrets to Qatar, killing protesters during a sit-in outside the presidential palace, and spying for Hamas.
He received multiple long sentences, including a life sentence for spying for Qatar and a 20-year sentence for killing protesters. A death sentence for charges relating to a mass jailbreak during the revolution was overturned in a retrial in November 2016.
The former president, who had a history of ill health including diabetes and liver and kidney disease, was held in solitary confinement in Tora prison in Cairo.
In 2018, a panel of three British parliamentarians reported that Morsi was being kept in solitary confinement for 23 hours a day, with just one hour allowed for exercise. The group, led by Crispin Blunt, said the conditions of Morsi’s confinement could be classified as torture and could also cut short his life.

Offline humbert

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Re: Documentaries
« Reply #193 on: June 18, 2019, 10:27 PM »
For those who are in the organisation of the Muslim brotherhood on the forum it’s a day of mourning.
Indeed, Egypt’s ousted president Mohamed Morsi has collapsed during a court session and died, almost six years after he was forced from power in a bloody coup.

It's pretty obvious that Morsi was killed by al-Sisi and his thugs. It just didn't happen in a single day. I suppose the only thing positive about al-Sisi is that he's not a radical Islamist. Other than that he's another Mubarak.


Re: Documentaries
« Reply #194 on: June 24, 2019, 02:54 PM »
It's pretty obvious that Morsi was killed by al-Sisi and his thugs. It just didn't happen in a single day. I suppose the only thing positive about al-Sisi is that he's not a radical Islamist. Other than that he's another Mubarak.
A mass murderer, yet you see the brights side in him.
How humane of you!
Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him) said “Surah (chapter of) Hud and its sisters turned my hair gray"

Hud (11)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiqxo4UDVfU

Offline humbert

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Re: Documentaries
« Reply #195 on: June 25, 2019, 09:41 PM »
A mass murderer, yet you see the brights side in him.
How humane of you!

Of course al-Sisi is a murderer! I don't question that for a second. At least under his rule no religion has dominance over any other and people can visit a Mosque or Coptic church as they please. Similarly, if you [for example] bake bread and sell it for a living, al-Sisi will probably just leave you alone. This is in sharp contrast to true totalitarian regimes such as the Saudi government or the Islamic Republic of Iran where the government is in every facet of your life.

Offline scarface

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Re: Documentaries
« Reply #196 on: June 30, 2019, 08:08 AM »
Here is an article about Paris, in French, which might pique the interest of the users of the forum like aa1234779. But it's not very positive.

Paris étouffe, même sans canicule
Paris paralysé, Paris pollué, Paris enlaidi. Ce n'est ni un hasard ni une nécessité. Seulement le résultat de décisions politiques aberrantes.



Il n'y a pas si longtemps, on venait vivre en ville parce que c'était mieux qu'à la campagne : plus de confort, de loisirs, de services, de soins… Ces perspectives décidaient des ruraux à s'installer dans les capitales, qu'elles soient régionales ou nationales. C'est toujours le cas, du moins en grande partie. De fait, les grandes villes de France demeurent, dans l'ensemble, agréables à habiter.

Sauf Paris. Le quotidien y a viré à l'enfer. Les malheureux résidents de cette cité, qui fut autrefois Ville Lumière, subissent l'entrelacement de  transports publics bondés , de  travaux sur la chaussée en nombre démesuré , d'embouteillages interminables, d'une pollution de l'air croissante, d'une insécurité sans précédent de la circulation, mêlant dans le plus anarchique désordre trottinettes, vélos, motos, voitures, bus et piétons… Le tout, en ce moment, par 40° à l'ombre. Evidemment, personne n'est responsable de  l'actuel pic de chaleur . Mais la cause de ce chaos urbain est directement politique.

Car ce n'est pas un effet du hasard si cette ville joyau est à présent invivable, encombrée, polluée, laide et vulgaire. Il n'y a là aucun effet du destin, aucune nécessité. Rien que des erreurs, des entêtements absurdes, des fantasmes idéologiques, des décisions contre-productives. Bref, une gestion délirante et néfaste. La liste détaillée des bourdes funestes de la maire de Paris au cours de son mandat occuperait plusieurs volumes. Les principaux exemples suffiront.

Il est urgent de purifier l'air de Paris, tout le monde en convient. Or il n'existe pour y parvenir qu'une seule méthode immédiatement efficace : commencer par rendre la circulation automobile la plus fluide possible. C'est le premier pas. Ensuite, on peut s'efforcer de diminuer le trafic, comme l'ont fait Londres ou Rome. A Paris, au contraire, la mairie s'est appliquée à paralyser systématiquement le trafic en bloquant le souterrain du Louvre, en fermant les voies sur berges à la circulation, en multipliant les voies cyclables et les chantiers. Résultat : les temps de trajet doublent, et surtout les taux de pollution augmentent. Est-ce cela qu'on appelle le sens de l'écologie ? Et de la gestion publique ?

Il est souhaitable de rénover la cité, là aussi tout le monde est d'accord. Pourtant, la multiplication de mobiliers urbains disparates et hétéroclites, la dissémination de nouvelles poubelles hideuses, le remplacement des kiosques à journaux stylés par des cubes de plastique sans grâce ne semblent pas aller dans ce sens. Ni les aménagements pseudo-festifs qui fleurissent un peu partout. Pas question de souhaiter que tout reste identique, mais il faut éviter que tout ne devienne abject.

Parce que cette ville n'est pas un amas de distractions. Elle fut aussi, et peut-être avant tout, un spectacle étonnant et sublime, une esthétique, un univers de détails innombrables et infimes en corrélation. Au lieu de respecter ces traits, d'améliorer le quotidien en tenant compte de leur existence, on les néglige, les détériore, les détruit. Si je tiens à le dire, c'est que je suis né à Paris, que ma mère y était née, et que j'aime ce lieu du monde. Pour en connaître pas mal d'autres, j'ai la faiblesse de croire celui-ci singulier entre tous. Mais fragile, éminemment. Et en péril, à présent.

Il faudrait appeler à la rescousse François Villon et Clément Marot, Rabelais et Montaigne, Balzac et Hugo, Benjamin et Aragon, et tant d'autres, tous amoureux de Paris, tous piétons, tous poètes et paroliers. Qu'ils empêchent, si possible, la ville de n'être plus que l'ombre d'elle-même, et d'étouffer de mille manières. Certes, les meurtres d'âme ne figurent pas au Code pénal, mais il est urgent de délivrer Paris des forces qui la minent , et de commencer à la réparer, avec l'allégresse qu'elle mérite.

Si ce n'était pas le cas, la grande kermesse olympique qui s'annonce devrait s'agrémenter d'épreuves inédites. On inaugurerait le slalom géant en trottinette électrique, le marathon immobile sans respiration, la compétition d'extase à Paris-plage. On tenterait de battre le record de la piste cyclable la plus longue et la moins fréquentée. On se vanterait de cent mérites et de mille vertus. Et l'on remporterait la médaille d'or du pire. Avant cela, s'il est encore temps, mieux vaudrait se souvenir de ce que Pierre de Coubertin n'a pas dit : en matière d'enfer, d'étouffement et de chaos, l'important est de ne pas participer.

Offline scarface

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Re: Documentaries
« Reply #197 on: July 04, 2019, 01:11 PM »
Tonight, I'm going to talk about Maurice.



Maybe some of you know Maurice. It's a rooster.

Maurice was Thursday put on trial in western France, in an unusual case that has come to symbolize the divide between urban and rural communities.
The copper-feathered cockerel is the defendant in a court battle stemming from a long-running neighborhood dispute over his early morning crowing.
His owner Corinne Fesseau told CNN that neighbors in the village of Saint-Pierre-d'Oléron, on the Isle of Oléron, first complained in April 2017, asking her to keep Maurice quiet.

"I've lived here for 35 years, it's never bothered anyone," she said.
However the neighbors accuse Maurice of causing noise pollution and the case was heard by the court in Rochefort, Charente Maritime on Thursday.
After the trial, Fesseau told CNN she was pleased with the developments and hopeful a solution could be found.
"I hope these people will understand the meaning of rurality," she said.
While a verdict is not expected until September 5, the trial has already ignited debate in France.
The neighbors in question are city dwellers who only visit Saint-Pierre-d'Oléron a few times per year, according to Fesseau.

Offline scarface

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Re: Documentaries
« Reply #198 on: July 07, 2019, 03:29 PM »
Tonight, I'm going to hold a conference about Sissi City, "a mirage under construction" according to an excellent article of the newspaper "Le Monde".

In the desert, East of Cairo, President Al-Sissi's dream of greatness is becoming a reality: to build a new capital, a showcase for the Egypt of the future. The exorbitant cost of the project in a context of serious economic crisis compromises its realization, and its ultra-security focus creates controversy.

Al-Fattah Al-Alim Mosque, inaugurated on January 6th, is the first completed building of the Egyptian "new capital".


Planted in the sand, the imposing Al-Fattah Al-Alim mosque flanked by its four minarets stands out on the horizon like a mirage in the desert. Covered with white marble and rich ornaments, able to accommodate 12,000 faithful, it must mark the entrance to the future Egyptian administrative capital. It is one of the first buildings of Egypt's flagship project, Abdel Fattah Al-Sissi, to have sprung up from the ground, with the Coptic Cathedral "Birth-of-Christ", the largest in the country, that is standing desperately empty  too. Between the two, a desert stretch of 16 kilometers, punctuated by construction sites and a few completed buildings.
It is here, about fifty kilometers east of Cairo, towards the strategic city of Suez, that an armada of workers, engineers and soldiers are working night and day, since May 2016, to build, on a portion of desert the size of Singapore, the showcase of the Egypt of tomorrow. "Sissi-City", as the Egyptians call it, was designed to be modern, sanitized, secure, sustainable and connected; a center of power capable of competing with the world's largest capitals. "Egyptians have the right to dream and realize their dreams" says an official who organizes the site visit. A vain project, retort his detractors, like his designer, Abdel Fattah Al-Sissi, who, since his accession to the presidency, in 2014, following the military coup against Islamist President Mohamed Morsi, could, thanks to a constitutional reform endorsed in April, remain in power until 2034. As a diplomat sums it up, "this mirage is taking shape, it is Sissi's legacy to his country ".
Faced with controversy, the authorities favor a pragmatic discourse. Cairo, with its 23 million inhabitants, and 40 million by 2050, has become a sprawling megalopolis dying under the pollution, traffic jams and anarchic construction of informal settlements. With the population explosion, which sees every year 2 million inhabitants added to the 100 million that it currently has, Egypt needs to expand its inhabited area - 7% of the territory - by nibbling the desert. "Forty years ago, the state was already thinking about an administrative capital, which shows that we need it urgently," says Khaled Al-Husseini, spokesperson for the Administrative Capital for Urban Development (ACUD), which carries the project. At the time, President Anwar Al-Sadat had thus imagined "Sadat City". Even more modest, this project had ended in failure.

If you look at the photo below you must be wondering where it is.
It's a view of Cairo from the citadel.
The Citadel was built on top of a hill during the 12th century by Saladin, the ruler of the city, to protect it from Crusader attacks.



Note that this conference might be undermined by grammatical mistakes. If it's the case I hope humbert or Vasudev will warn me.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2019, 03:51 PM by scarface »

Offline scarface

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Re: Documentaries
« Reply #199 on: July 08, 2019, 05:16 PM »
Tonight, I'm going to hold another conference. aa1234779 must be wondering if I'm going to talk about Maurice, the rooster. Actually, I will talk about Maurice if I have more news about the trial. Currently, I'm going to talk about Qalqilya, the biggest town of Palestine and secondarily the town of the administrator of the forum.

Here you can see a few photos of the town.

The road network seems to be in excellent condition.


A big mosque


The local market. It seems poverty does not exist in this country. You can't see any beggar. They must be hiding in the sewers or in the subway stations, like in New York.


It's hard to know the population of Qalqilya. Some sources say 40 000 inhabitants, others say 90 000. As you can see on the photo, it's a major town in the Middle East.


It looks like the X games spot.



Qalqilya is a memorable city for many reasons, but there is surely no other city in the world as completely cut off from its suburbs. The Israeli division wall strangles this large and lively city, hemming it in on three sides. But it is still an attractive place once inside, and very green comparatively. There are palm trees and small orchards in abundance. The only zoo in the West Bank is to be found in Qalqilya, serving as its main attraction. But the market – much smaller than that of Nablus and Jerusalem – is a quirky and interesting place to stroll, where friendly vendors will welcome a foreigner with open arms.
Qalqilya is also famous for another reason. There are documentaries about skaters and their misfit gang, the x-games.

Note that I made a mistake: the fourth photo is not Qalqilya but Cairo. Some of you probably noticed it.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2019, 05:19 PM by scarface »