Author Topic: What kind of meat (or cheese) is it?  (Read 35957 times)

August 15, 2021, 02:03 PM
Reply #220
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Tonight, I'm going to show you another recipe.

First and foremost, let the users of the forum analyze the ingredients of this recipe.
Maybe humbert or Vasudev are already able to identify the fish on the photos.




What you see here is a mackerel.
 

I thought that many users of the forum would recognize this fish, but it may not be the case.
On the map below, you can see the mackerel distribution in the world.



The potatoes are precooked for 10 minutes.



Then the mackerel is put in the middle of the potatoes and cooked for 20 minutes.





« Last Edit: August 15, 2021, 04:54 PM by scarface »

August 19, 2021, 02:36 PM
Reply #221
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Tonight, I'm going to show you another recipe.

Look at the photos below.
humbert and shadow.97 must be wondering what kind of sausage it is. Is it a boudin? A figatellu? A saucisse de Montbéliard?
You can also try to analyze the cooking method used.
I'm going to reveal the nature of this sausage: it is a figatellu, or more precisely half of the sausage since figatelli have a distincive U-shape.
Maher and humbert must be wondering why I'm boiling the sausage in a saucepan to cook it: because sometimes figatelli are too salty, boiling it may change the texture of the meat, but it will help dissolve more of the salt.



« Last Edit: August 20, 2021, 12:44 PM by scarface »

August 26, 2021, 05:11 AM
Reply #222
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Today, I'm going to tell you how to get a well-cooked pizza.

Look at the photo below.



You can see a pizza with jambon, mozarella and mushrooms. But how to cook it?
Preheating the oven is an essential step, whether you are making pizza or other dishes. It will allow your appliance to heat up so that, when you place your dish on it, the desired cooking temperature is already reached. In general, the preheating time is about 10 minutes, depending on the power of the oven and the desired temperature. In order to bake a pizza, it is advisable to set your electric oven to the highest heat offered. Indeed, for a perfect cooking, the temperature must be high. Thus, on a traditional oven, you can generally select a temperature between 230 ° C and 250 ° C. If you have a professional electric oven or a pizza oven, the maximum temperature can be up to 270 ° C.
For a successful pizza, its dough must be able to swell very quickly. Indeed, if the cooking lasts, the foods in your pizza may overcook or even wet your dough. It will then not become crispy.

August 27, 2021, 09:48 PM
Reply #223
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Today, I'm going to tell you how to get a well-cooked pizza.

This thing looks like someone burned it.

August 28, 2021, 05:46 PM
Reply #224
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This thing looks like someone burned it.

Maybe this wouldn't have happened with your expertise indeed.
Actually, I put the pizza on an oven rack that was probably too close to the resistance, hence the over-burnt impression of the dough. But the pizza was pretty good.

Now imagine this scene. We are together, with humbert, Maher, Vasudev, shadow.97, aa1234779...
aa1234779 and Vasudev are drinking a Pastis-tomate, the quintessential beverage of Provence. At the same table, shadow.97 is talking about the new DDR5 to Maher. I'm watching an episode of Melrose place with humbert.
In the meantime the pizza is in the oven. But we suddenly realize that we have forgotten the pizza: it's burnt ! This is something that often happens when nobody is focused enough on the primary mission.
And here is the outcome of the process:



September 06, 2021, 12:35 PM
Reply #225
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Tonight, I'm going to show you another dish.
On the photo below, you can see a little caillette and some bred.




Caillette is minced meat mixed with cabbage or chard then cooked in a cloth.
It comes from the Ardèche region in south-central France which is famous for chestnuts, sheep farming, Stone Age cave paintings and a scenic river... and the slightly flattened, souped-up meatballs dating back to the 16th century known as caillettes.
Pork has always been closely linked with the lives of the country folk of the Ardèche, with the traditional "tuade" (pig-killing) becoming the occasion for a village fête. Charcuterie, sausages, pâtés, and caillettes made their appearance on the table at every mealtime.