Author Topic: good movies  (Read 161792 times)

October 11, 2021, 02:21 PM
Reply #360
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I watched this movie in the early 90's and at this time I remember I had been very scared.

I assume you saw this in a movie theater. I'm curious about something. Did they have French subtitles or did they dub in the voices?

Actually, I watched this movie with a cousin, and it was obviously in French. Unlike Russia, in the movies dubbed in French, there is only one language (In foreign movies dubbed in Russian, you can still hear the original language with the Russian dubbing).

Subsequently, I’ve been to the theater several times in the 90,’s.
Note that "going to the theater is an American expression to say "to go to the cinema", in England you say "to go to the movies", and in French  you say "aller au cinéma" or "aller voir un film" whereas "aller au théâtre" means "to see a play" which also means "to go to the theatre" in England.
But each time the movie was in French (Edward scissorhands, The virgin suicide, The 5th element, Fight club, Blair Witch 2, Resident Evil, The men in black, The lord of the ring, Titanic...). At this time, I was living with my father in a small town in the Drôme department (for some reasons my mother didn’t want to raise a child).
In the 90’s, very few movies broadcast in English with French subtitles...because few people were speaking this language. Even in the TV series, the opening credits were adapted.
Maybe you are a fan of the TV series Dallas, with Bobby and JR. In the early 90’s I was watching it with my paternal grandmother, who died in 1996 of breast cancer). Here you can see the French opening credits, which were adapted. They were an ode to the glory of Texas. You are going to be dumbfounded: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rlfHcCLn4pk
But Nowadays, you can find many theatres with films in original version with French subtitles  (in French: version originale or VO avec sous titres). However...it mainly depends on where you live.
And you are lucky: for you, I found a study conducted by a movie specialist and translated it:
"Most cinemas do not necessarily offer original version en French version. On the two anamorphosis maps below, the bigger a department, the more its inhabitants are offered sessions in VO (in red) or in French (in green).





In some regions, the original version is reserved for small downtown cinemas or arthouse cinemas. But some multiplex networks also schedule a large number of original sessions, such as UGC. If we go to the city level, it is of course in Paris that most original versions are offered. But the suburbs and a few towns in province are quite good, such as Montreuil, Biarritz and Hérouville-Saint-Clair in the lead, before the capital if we take into account the total share of the sessions in original version. Conversely, there are parts of France where no theatres are offering original versions. You have probably noticed that the following departments are missing on the red map indeed:
Ariege
Creuse
Haute-Saône
Indre
Orne


Some clips:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOckdooNDfE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynQo9G5w4I0
« Last Edit: October 11, 2021, 02:41 PM by scarface »

October 11, 2021, 09:15 PM
Reply #361
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Here rarely does anybody say "go to the cinema". More often than not we say "go to the movies".

I am convinced that the movie theater is another old technology that is headed for extinction. Every day that passes getting the latest movies becomes easier while large TV screen gets cheaper and more ubiquitous.

October 12, 2021, 12:24 PM
Reply #362
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Here rarely does anybody say "go to the cinema". More often than not we say "go to the movies".
Actually I knew it and it was a mistake or rather a confusion.
And if you use the expression "go to the cinema" in Texas, maybe someone will ask you where it comes from and you'll say: it's a Gallicism: I'm learning French on a forum and I now speak it so well I'm mixing English and French !

In the US, the handoffs from French called gallicisms are probably pretty rare, but as I wrote in a previous message on the forum, anglicisms are unfortunately more and more common in French. For example, a few days ago I stumbled upon an article of le Monde titled "La valorisation de la recherche doit être remise en haut de l’agenda politique et scientifique". The problem is that "agenda politique" is borrowed from the English expression political agenda, and it doesn't mean anything. In French the word "agenda" means calendar, or schedule in a figurative sense, but it doesn't mean program.
However, it would have been correct to use the expression "être au programme politique (to be on the political program).

October 12, 2021, 09:54 PM
Reply #363
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Actually I knew it and it was a mistake or rather a confusion.
And if you use the expression "go to the cinema" in Texas, maybe someone will ask you where it comes from and you'll say: it's a Gallicism: I'm learning French on a forum and I now speak it so well I'm mixing English and French !

There is no such thing as a Texan who knows the definition of the word "Gallicism", and they have no interest in learning.