Author Topic: New topic Photos  (Read 198966 times)

August 25, 2021, 04:58 AM
Reply #400
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I had planned to show you some photos of a painting exhibition by the artists of the Mediterranean basin in Port Camargue but it was a bit disappointing. Instead, I'm going to show you some photos of Nîmes.


You certainly think that the best preserved temple of the Roman world is located in Italy. That's not the case: it's the square house, in Nîmes.
Construction of the temple started around 16 BC or slightly earlier, at the very start of the Pax Augusta or “Augustan Peace”. The first emperor of Rome, Augustus, established a definitive peace after decades of civil war; a fact celebrated, among other things, in Virgil’s Aeneid. As part of the new imperial cult, and to mark the dawn of a new era of peace and prosperity, the Romans undertook huge monumental building programmes. But new structures were not just built in Rome or even Italy, but also in the provinces further afield. Nîmes, a major city in the province of Gallia Narbonensis, benefited from this building programme.
Nîmes, known in ancient times as Nemausus, was gifted beautiful temples, but it also acquired one of the largest amphitheatres in the ancient world, in addition to many other public structures. To supply the city with water, a monumental aqueduct was constructed that, like the Arena and the Maison Carrée, continues to draw visitors: the Pont du Gard.
The Maison Carrée was dedicated, in the early years of the common era, to Gaius and Lucius Caesar. Augustus had intended these grandsons to be his heirs, but they died young. Eventually, Augustus had no choice but to appoint Tiberius, the son of the emperor’s wife Livia from an earlier marriage, as his heir.
The Maison Carrée is a typical example of a Roman temple, which in basic structure owes more to the Etruscans than the Greeks. Unlike a Greek temple, which can be approached from any side, a Roman temple can only be accessed from the front. The Maison Carrée has a tall podium, about 2.65m in height, with a flight of steps that provides access to the temple’s pronaos or portico. The podium is 26.42m in length and 13.54m wide. The top of the building rises about 15m above the level of the ground.




Some comments will be added later for these photos.












August 25, 2021, 09:15 PM
Reply #401
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It never ceases to amaze me how advanced the Roman Empire was. It's sad that many of their advancements in plumbing, engineering and making concrete (among others) were lost to history. They were doing just great until the Christians showed up and pretty much ruined everything. Unfortunately there were too many Christians and not enough lions.

Hitler wanted a 1000 year reich. The Roman Empire lasted longer than that and, sadly, so did the Papal States.

August 26, 2021, 04:51 AM
Reply #402
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Today, new photos are available on the forum.


Here you can see a photo taken on the beach in Grau du roi. On the right, you can see the buildings of Grau du roi. In the Background, you can see La Grande Motte.




Last Saturday, I've been to La Grande Motte and I took a few photos:







Right next to the pharmacy situated on the quai Georges Pompidou, there is a good bar-restaurant, Le Delos Maison de la Biere.