Author Topic: New topic Photos  (Read 181332 times)

April 07, 2021, 06:50 AM
Reply #310
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I disagree. In fact I'm very ignorant. The list of people I mentioned are men who are known pretty much everywhere. For example, you don't need to be a Frenchman to be familiar with the events of the French Revolution, or the fact that Napoleon took over almost all of Europe. And of course almost everywhere you go milk is pasteurized.

I do firmly believe the study of history is very important. The past is extremely linked to the present. In order to get a good understanding of a group of people, it's important to understand how they got to where they are right now.
I remember that you even asked me what happened to the prison at place of Bastille. I'm not sure many Americans are aware there was a prison at place of Bastille. If you go in the street and if you show a photo of Louis XIV, whether it is in France or in Texas, few will be able to recognize him. But if you show a photo of Ronald Mc Donald, everyone will know who he is.

April 07, 2021, 07:00 AM
Reply #311
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Today, I took a few photos.
I decided to head south.
What you see is the Mediterranean Sea, on a beach, near Montpellier.


Some boats.


Algae deposits attract many flamingos to shores.

April 07, 2021, 12:14 PM
Reply #312
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Here are 2 new photos taken today of Aigues-Mortes, a very old fortified city in the Gard, in the heart of the swamps.
The medieval city walls surrounding the city are well preserved.
This was the city from which Louis IX twice departed for the Seventh Crusade in 1248 and for the Eighth Crusade in 1270, where he died of dysentery at Tunis.
Here you can only hear the wind and the singulls singing. This place is very quiet when you are looking for a place to hide away from the sounds of cars.








April 07, 2021, 08:45 PM
Reply #313
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I remember that you even asked me what happened to the prison at place of Bastille. I'm not sure many Americans are aware there was a prison at place of Bastille. If you go in the street and if you show a photo of Louis XIV, whether it is in France or in Texas, few will be able to recognize him. But if you show a photo of Ronald Mc Donald, everyone will know who he is.

Come to think of it, is the Bastille prison a museum today? I'm thinking the birthplace of the French Revolution must be in some way preserved.

I can understand that in Texas they wouldn't recognize an image of Louis XIV. But in France? Surely everybody has to know who Monsieur l'etat c'est  moi was.

The vast majority of Americans are very ignorant and, what's even worse, they have no interest in learning. I heard a statistic that 20% of high school seniors don't know who won the American Civil War, and don't care. This is no accident. The oligarchy that rules this country wants it that way and have created a decrepit educational system to make sure that doesn't change. Who needs an oppressive secret police when the vast majority of the people believe anything the government tells them and blindly do as they're told?

April 08, 2021, 04:52 PM
Reply #314
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Come to think of it, is the Bastille prison a museum today? I'm thinking the birthplace of the French Revolution must be in some way preserved.
The Bastille prison was completely destroyed during the French revolution.
The last remaining traces of the old fortress of the Bastille can be found in the 4th arrondissement, on square Henri Galli.

April 09, 2021, 04:28 AM
Reply #315
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Here are new photos taken this morning.




Here you can see the work of art of an artist: some sand sculptures. In the background you can spot a seagull.



April 09, 2021, 09:19 PM
Reply #316
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So what happened on July 14, 1789 was that a mob overwhelmed the king's guards, stormed the prison, freed the prisoners AND destroyed the prison in the process? Was it burned down or what? Too bad the government didn't build some memorial (or replica) to such a crucial place in French history.

With respect to the pictures you took, is the body of water in the background the Mediterranean? I don't think there those types of resorts on the frigid Atlantic. If it was the Med, then where are you living? Last I heard you were somewhere in Paris or thereabouts.

April 10, 2021, 02:52 AM
Reply #317
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So what happened on July 14, 1789 was that a mob overwhelmed the king's guards, stormed the prison, freed the prisoners AND destroyed the prison in the process? Was it burned down or what? Too bad the government didn't build some memorial (or replica) to such a crucial place in French history.
The French Revolution was caused by a multitude of grievances but bread shortages played a role in stoking anger toward the monarchy.
The storming of the medieval fortress of Bastille on July 14, 1789 began as a hunt for arms—and grains to make bread.
Actually The Bastille was later demolished and replaced by the Place de la Bastille. It took nearly 2 years to destroy the Bastille: On 16 July 1789 - Jacques Necker is reappointed as Finance Minister by King Louis, and the newly-elected Paris assembly voted to destroy the Bastille.
A few months after the Bastille was destroyed, during the night of 20–21 June 1791 was a significant episode in the French Revolution in which King Louis XVI and his family attempted to escape from Paris in order to initiate a counter-revolution at the head of loyal troops under royalist officers concentrated at Montmédy near the frontier. They escaped only as far as the small town of Varennes-en-Argonne, where they were arrested after having been recognized at their previous stop in Sainte-Menehould.

With respect to the pictures you took, is the body of water in the background the Mediterranean? I don't think there those types of resorts on the frigid Atlantic. If it was the Med, then where are you living? Last I heard you were somewhere in Paris or thereabouts.
This is the Mediterranean Sea indeed. I'm living in Le Grau du Roi, I have an apartment here.The  Camargue is an unspoilt and well-preserved nature area. If I had the choice I would live here you know.

In the Camargue, the bull is king. He is acclaimed as the hero of the Camargue race, which sets the rhythm in all the Bouvine villages from Easter to October.
Typical of the midday, the Camargue race is a bullfighting game that takes place in the arenas. The purpose of the raseteur (all dressed in white) is to catch with bare hand the attributes hanging on the bull’s head. They are three in number and must be caught in the following order: the roundel (red ribbon attached between the horns), the acorns (white wool pompom attached to the basa of each horn), then the strings that surround the base of the horns. Shavers use a 4-pronged hook, sometimes attached to the wrist. Once taken, the bull pursues the raseteur in the arena, not hesitating to rush into the barriers. The Camargue races celebrate the courage of the bulls and the agility of the raseteurs. The Camargue bull or «cocardier» is indeed smarter, more nervous and faster than its Spanish cousin, the fighting bull. The cocardier gets caught up in the game and progresses through the races. It becomes more difficult to shave. Some even become real local stars. When they die, tradition dictates that he be buried standing with his head turned towards the sea.

I guess Vasudev, aa1234779 and shadow.97 have never seen Camargue races:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5lGRwcmQBw

April 10, 2021, 08:50 PM
Reply #318
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This is the Mediterranean Sea indeed. I'm living in Le Grau du Roi, I have an apartment here.The  Camargue is an unspoilt and well-preserved nature area. If I had the choice I would live here you know.

You bought an apartment at Le Grau du Roi? Awesome. Why do you not have a choice of living there? Is it job related? If you can't live there what's the point of buying the apartment?

Also: how to you get there from Paris (assuming you're living there)? Do you drive or catch a train?

In the Camargue, the bull is king. He is acclaimed as the hero of the Camargue race, which sets the rhythm in all the Bouvine villages from Easter to October.

I was watching the video. From what I'm seeing it's a French form of bullfighting that [hopefully] doesn't involve mercilessly slaughtering the bull. I saw a bullfight once while visiting Bogotá, Colombia. It's sickening! The bull has no chance of winning and is slowly tortured to death. I almost couldn't bare to watch it. I ended up cheering the bull.

April 12, 2021, 08:23 PM
Reply #319
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Hey Scarface! Of course you know more about French history than I do, so I have a question. Why is Charles DeGaulle such an important figure? As far as I know, he was involved in World War I but not to the extent where he stands out. During the occupation during World War II, instead of staying home leading the French underground he was living comfortably in England waiting for the British and Americans to liberate his country and install him as president. It's my understanding that shortly thereafter he blackmailed the Americans to restore France's colonies in Indochina or he would go with the Russians. When Algeria tried to become independent, first he tried to crush the rebellion, then he changed his mind and ended up betraying French Algerians who didn't want independence. And finally, on our about 1967 he traveled to Canada and urged to Quebeçois to essentially rebel against Canada, thereby embarrassing his hosts.

So tell me, what am I missing and/or which of my facts is wrong?