Author Topic: What kind of meat (or cheese) is it?  (Read 17966 times)

March 13, 2020, 03:22 PM
Reply #110
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Tonight, another recipe is available on the forum.

I assume some users, like humbert or shadow.97, already know this recipe.
I'm waiting for your feedback.
Note that this Beaujolais wine called "Moulin à vent" is a real disappointment.


March 15, 2020, 09:35 PM
Reply #111
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I assume some users, like humbert or shadow.97, already know this recipe.
I'm waiting for your feedback.

I believe that spending hours cooking a meal is not practical. Today you can find all kinds of frozen stuff you can prepare very quickly in the microwave. You can also make a sandwich with pre-cooked meat and cheese, or eat cans of tuna with crackers or anything else. I'm omnivorous. The only things I won't eat are coconuts, pecans, almonds and raisins. I'll also drink any beer or wine as long as it's not bitter.

March 20, 2020, 08:47 AM
Reply #112
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Today, Im presenting another recipe: basmati rice with olive oil and turmeric, beef tenderloin, and slices of avocado. With this, I choose an excellent bottle of Chianti.
Maybe some of you are in solitary confinement like me. In these difficult times, its important to eat well, cook, so as to not be depressed.


March 23, 2020, 03:30 PM
Reply #113
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Tonight, I am going to present another recipe.

First off, I am going to let you analyze this photo and I will explain later what it is.
For humbert, vasudev or shadow.97, this dish has probably no secret.



if you did not recognize this dish, it is a duck cassoulet of course, with a pork sausage and white beans.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2020, 04:32 PM by scarface »

March 23, 2020, 09:41 PM
Reply #114
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First off, I am going to let you analyze this photo and I will explain later what it is.
For humbert, vasudev or shadow.97, this dish has probably no secret.

I had no clue what his dish is until I read your description. I've never seen duck cassoulet, let alone eaten it.

March 24, 2020, 01:21 AM
Reply #115
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I had no clue what his dish is until I read your description. I've never seen duck cassoulet, let alone eaten it.
Actually I was not really expecting you to know it, because Cassoulet is a traditional French stew made with pork and beans. I am sure you wished you were here to taste it or the excellent bottle of Chianti.

This traditional bean- and meat-based dish from the southwest of France comes in three versions, and each version is a separate dish in its own right. The name cassoulet comes from the name of the dish used to prepare it, called a cassole.
The dish is braised for hours in this glazed terracotta casserole pot at a low temperature until the meat and beans are soft enough to melt in your mouth. Three cities claim to be home to the original recipe, and while they are eternally striving for the title of “best cassoulet”, all agree on one thing – this dish is held sacred in the Lauragais region.
One version comes from Castelnaudary, and is based on white kidney beans with pork products such as smoked ham, spicy sausages, and pork shoulder. Cassoulet de Carcassonne adds chunks of mutton, lamb, partridge, or quail, while cassoulet Toulousain combines duck or goose confit with all of the aforementioned ingredients.
This staple of French comfort food is best enjoyed on a cold winter day and it is recommended to accompany it with a glass of fragrant, full-bodied red wine.

This dish is fairly well-known, but probably not as known as the couscous or as the Spanish Paella.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2020, 01:39 AM by scarface »

March 25, 2020, 08:25 AM
Reply #116
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Today, I am going to present another recipe: a fillet of beef, with some beans cooked in butter.
With this dish, we have a prestigious wine, a Lalande de Pomerol. This is a wine appellation of the Right Bank of the Bordeaux region in southwestern France. It lies just to the north of the more-prestigious Pomerol title, in the area known as the Libournais, after the city of Libourne. Only red wines are classified under the Lalande-de-Pomerol AOP. They are made predominantly from Merlot, but may also contain Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Malbec.
I tasted this wine and it is excellent. And yet, it is much cheaper (9€ for a bottle like this) than the more prestigious Pomerol.

« Last Edit: March 25, 2020, 08:57 AM by scarface »

March 26, 2020, 01:46 PM
Reply #117
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Tonight, I am going to present another recipe.
Look carefully at the picture below.



humbert and usmangujjar are not dreaming: this is beef carpaccio - even if I cooked the meat - with basil. With this, we have some beans and potatoes cooked with butter, and a good wine (actually, this is the rest of yesterday's bottle).
I prefer when the meat is done. But normally, a beef carpaccio is served raw. A carpaccio is top quality meat that has been hung for a good period of time to improve flavour and texture. Rare breed beef will give a great result, as these cows tend to have a slightly deeper flavour and are less intensively farmed, producing better-quality meat. The most commonly used cut for carpaccio is the centre of the fillet, although sirloin can be used for a more intense flavour.

March 28, 2020, 01:45 PM
Reply #118
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Note that a new recipe, as well as the new version of windows 10 will be presented later tonight.

March 28, 2020, 07:48 PM
Reply #119
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Tonight, I am going to present another dish.
Look carefully at the picture below.




This tasty grilled salmon and lemony rice with olive oil drizzle is  what I came up with.
This rice is subtly lemony with hints of basil and garlic. Add a superfood kick of turmeric and the addition of olive oil at the end makes the dish. Use only a good, fresh oil. Goes well with fish, chicken and Hispanic dishes.
Serve along with sweet carotts and slices of avocato, and it is an enticing crunch.
With this, we are going to open a bottle of Saint-Émilion. Made predominantly from Merlot and Cabernet Franc, Saint-Émilion wines tend to have a rich, mouth-drying tannic structure, which is balanced by the more juicy characteristics of plum and black cherry fruit, along with chocolate and sweet spice, developing savory tobacco and cedar characteristics with age.
The best Saint-Émilion wines will exhibit a terrific mineral vein, the result of vines being planted on the region's limestone escarpment. Vines planted on sandy soils tend to produce grapes that make lighter styled wines.