• Welcome to Maher's Digital World.

What kind of meat (or cheese) is it?

Started by scarface, October 11, 2015, 07:02 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

scarface

Quote from: Shadow.97 on June 04, 2022, 03:00 AMSpinach is one of my favorite foods, especially stewed.
I found yours to be quite dark colored.

Paté is something I would put on bread, but not eat separately.
If I have spinach I usually eat it in a bowl by itself as a snack.
If I have it with something else it is usually fish and potato.
The colour of the spinach doesn't look accurate indeed. But this photo was taken with flash and it might brighten the colours. What's more, there is a lamp on the left of the table. And if you're taking a photo next to a warm light source, it automatically makes the image a bit bluer.
As for the pâté, you are right, it doesn't pair well with spinach indeed.

The photo below was taken from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uofLnai7Yk4
Apparently the only way to get this strong is to eat spinach.

Daniil

Quote from: scarface on May 16, 2022, 11:02 PMTonight, I'm going to present another recipe on the forum.


Look carefully at the photo below.



What you see is certainly a healthy meal made of chopped spinach and pâté. If you are looking at the glass, you must think that the color of the wine is somewhat unusual. Were it a claret, I wouldn't drink it. Actually, this is a glass of orange juice.

On the left of the picture, you can see the Pâté: this is a French term used to describe a dish made from a mixture of ground meat and fat. Traditionally, pâtés include organ meat; liver is the most commonly used, as it contributes positively to both the earthy flavor and the spreadable texture of the pâté.
If you are vegan you must be think this pâté is just fuming and slaughtered animal meat. Hopefully, this is not the case: It's an excellent pâté de campagne. You should care about the sourcing of your meat. Purchase from a trusted butcher to make sure it's high-quality and fresh.


Vasudev and humbert may find the green stuff disgusting. But this leafy vegetable, known as spinach, is considered a superfood because of the loads of nutrients and low-calorie that it possesses. Some of the powerful health benefits of spinach are that this vegetable helps stabilise your blood glucose levels, helps in reducing your risk of developing cancer and is good for bone health.
If you want to be as strong as Popeye, you should probably add spinach to your diet.



Spinach is very rare food here, for us in Russia it's something very exotic.
Pâté is spreaded here a bit more, and we call it "zalivnOye", literally "meat covered with fat". It's difficult to make, but very tasty - at tsar's time it was a food of aristocrats.
Russian pâté, or, as we call it "pashtEt", is cooking a bit different way (it's simplified version of pâté).

scarface

#272
Quote from: Daniil on June 06, 2022, 12:19 AMSpinach is very rare food here, for us in Russia it's something very exotic.
Pâté is spreaded here a bit more, and we call it "zalivnOye", literally "meat covered with fat". It's difficult to make, but very tasty - at tsar's time it was a food of aristocrats.
Russian pâté, or, as we call it "pashtEt", is cooking a bit different way (it's simplified version of pâté).

I did some research on the spinach topic and it turns out that Russia doesn't produce spinach at all. It's probably for cultural reasons and not for climatic motives since its eastern neighbour, China, makes up for 90% of the world production of spinach. The US (and Japan against all odds) are also big producers. In Europe, France is the largest producer.


As for the Zalivnoye, after seeking out information about it, it turns out it's made with fish, joints of meat, or game birds coated in flavored gelatin and elaborately decorated.


It's always difficult to find information about Russian products since the word Zalinvoye is probably a phonetic transcription of a Russian word. You can hardly link this word to a pâté with the results on internet and most refer to a town with a similar name near Kaliningrad.
Apparently the Zalinvoye was created by...French chefs who toiled in the aristocratic kitchens of 19th century Russia. Actually this pâté is reminiscent of the pâté en croute, a kind of  terrine wrapped in a pastry crust. It is often eaten in France as an appetizer or starter.
The pâté en croute is usually made of veal and pork filling supplemented with poultry. Generally there is a sheet of gelatin on the pâté: when cooked, pâté shrinks; gelatin is thus usually poured over the pâté to help it expand. The gelatin also helps keep the pâté moist and compact, preventing it from being too friable when eaten.

Daniil

Quote from: scarface on June 06, 2022, 01:50 AMAs for the Zalivnoye, after seeking out information about it, it turns out it's made with fish, joints of meat, or game birds coated in flavored gelatin and elaborately decorated.

Yes. I was incorrect, when thought that a pâté is a zalivnoye. After I shown your photos to my mother, she said that pâté is looking more like zelts than the zalivnoye.

Zelts is a dish came to Russia from Germany. Zelts is looks much more like a pâté, than zalivnoye. It isn't cheap, and the quality of zelts in our stores in St.Petersburg are mostly very poor (it's looking not as appetite as on your photo, but as a dirty-gray paste of fat with rare pieces of skin and tendons). So most of us never bought it. I ate a good quality zelts it only one or two times in Izmail, in Ukraine.

Here is a small article about what is Zelts at Wikipedia.

Quote from: scarface on June 06, 2022, 01:50 AMIt's always difficult to find information about Russian products since the word Zalinvoye is probably a phonetic transcription of a Russian word. You can hardly link this word to a pâté with the results on internet and most refer to a town with a similar name near Kaliningrad.
Apparently the Zalinvoye was created by...French chefs who toiled in the aristocratic kitchens of 19th century Russia. Actually this pâté is reminiscent of the pâté en croute, a kind of  terrine wrapped in a pastry crust. It is often eaten in France as an appetizer or starter.

Yes, the word "zalivnoye" is a transliteration from Russian. Your investigation was correct. Zalivnoye was a dish made by french chiefs at rich restaurants and aristocratic kitchens. There is a lot of mentions of zalivnoye in a classic russian literature, for example, at books written by Lev Tolstoy.
Zalivnoye is a more tender version of a "holodets". Holodets is almost a same thing, but it is without fish meat, and cooking without carrot ang gelatine. Gelly-like consistence achieved by a collagen from cattle bones, boiled with meat for long time, and then cooled, also for a long time. (That's why holodets is called "holodets" - from russian word холод, means cold and pronounced as "holod") Holodets is very tasty vith horseradish, vodka and black bread. It's a holiday dish, we eat it at New Year/Christmas holidays.

scarface

Tonight, I'm going to unveil a new recipe.

Look carefully at the photos below.






Do humbert and Maher really know what the green stuff is?

In the first photo, you can see some sausages and a Zucchini (the word used in the USA). Zucchini, also known as courgette (the name in French is courgette btw), is a summer squash in the Cucurbitaceae plant family, alongside melons, spaghetti squash, and cucumbers. Although zucchini is often considered a vegetable, it is botanically classified as a fruit.
To cook all this:
First, slice the zucchini.
In a large skillet, drizzle with olive oil.
Add the slices of zucchini in a single layer.
Then add the sausages.
The zucchini will only take a few minutes to cook. Make sure to stir frequently until they start to brown and then remove them.
When the sausages are finished cooking, the dish is ready.



Note that the new version of windows 11 will be available as soon as possible. More registry tweaks are included in this version and will disclosed when it's ready.
Note that new videos will be added soon too.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-3CUaL2LmI
https://i.ibb.co/vwM2Tcb/baboon2.jpg

scarface

#275
Tonight, I'm going to present a new recipe.

Look at carefully at the photo below.


Maybe some of you can identify the various ingredients of this dish.

Some users of the forum like Humbert or Vasudev have certainly identified the ingredients in the photo:
A ratatouille and some sausages.

Ratatouille isn't just a Disney movie. If you know the movie, then, of course, you also know the luscious French Provençal dish. This simple, silky stew of eggplant, tomato, zucchini and red pepper flavored with onions, and always a lot of olive oil is a delicately-seasoned celebration of summer's most beloved vegetables. While ratatouille is delicious served all on its own, it's classically rich with oil, so it's a rib-sticking vegetarian dinner as is. If shadow.97 and humbert are wondering why I added 2 pork sausages, the reason is simple: I added them to the mix to take this recipe to new heights.
Instead of Domino or Mcdonald, I think it's advisable to take some time to prepare healthy recipe like that with vegetables.


Now I'm going to give the users of the forum a French lesson. Humbert and Maher are already speaking several languages, but they are not highly proficient in French. Then, if they were at the butcher's (a French-speaking one), they wouldn't know what to order.
Let's take the following sentence:
I would like a big sausage and a big saucisson.
First difficulty: the gender.
In English it's pretty simple: In general, the English language make no distinction between masculine, feminine and neuter gender nouns. However, the neuter gender is generally used when talking about things or animals, this distinction doesn't exist in French: French nouns have either a masculine gender or a feminine gender.
Now if we translate this in French, we get this:
"Je voudrais une grosse saucisse et un gros saucisson."
If you want your sentence to be correct, you need to know that "saucisse" is a feminine word while saucisson is a masculine word. The indefinite article "un" or "une" agrees in gender with the noun.
As for the adjective "gros" (in most cases the word gross doesn't mean "gros"), it agrees in both gender and number with the noun.
As for the pronunciation, the s of "gros" is a silent letter, but it's not the case for "grosse", so it's important to know the gender of the noun even for the pronunciation of the adjective in the sentence. If we choose a word other than "saucisson" that doesn't begin with a s or a vowel (otherwise there is a liaison between the adjective and the noun and yet it doesn't sound like the s in "grosse" but like a z), like "un gros bol" (a big bowl), it would sound terribly awkward to hear a "s" in the sentence.
Second difficulty: the place of the adjective. If in English the rule is simple (they are always before the noun), it's not the case in French.
Many common French adjectives usually come before the noun like "petit" (small), "nouveau" (new), "joli" (pretty), "long" (long), "gros" (big), meilleur (better)...
But in fact, French adjectives usually go after the noun they are describing. It's the case when you use an adjective of color too.
Actually those are basic rules, they are not really difficult, even if this is not always logical.
For those who are learning French, all this must seems difficult. And we haven't even talked about the groups of common adjectives whose meaning changes depending on whether they come before the noun or go after it...
For example with the adjective "propre" (clean), "cher"(expensive),  you can see the difference between
"ma propre chambre" (my own bedroom) / "une chambre propre" (a clean bedroom).
"cher shadow.97" (dear shadow.97) / un fruit cher (an expensive fruit) - ("shadow.97 cher" would make no sense).

Humbert and aa1234779 were certainly thinking that learning French was a matter of a few weeks. I imagine that they must be drinking a glass of Pastis, trying to understand those grammar rules.

scarface

Note that I added comments in the previous message.

humbert

Scarface -> Genderized nouns and adjectives after nouns exist in all Romance languages, or at least the ones I know something about. At first this is confusing for English speakers, but as they slowly familiarize themselves with the language it comes automatically.

Guliver

Quote from: scarface on June 22, 2022, 09:20 PMSome users of the forum like Humbert or Vasudev have certainly identified the ingredients in the photo:
A ratatouille and some sausages.

Ooh, I love ratatouille. Did you prepare it yourself?

scarface

Quote from: Guliver on June 24, 2022, 01:44 AM
Quote from: scarface on June 22, 2022, 09:20 PMSome users of the forum like Humbert or Vasudev have certainly identified the ingredients in the photo:
A ratatouille and some sausages.

Ooh, I love ratatouille. Did you prepare it yourself?
Well, Gulliver, you are right to have doubts, because I didn't prepare it myself. The ratatouille was a ready meal.