Author Topic: What kind of meat (or cheese) is it?  (Read 22739 times)

November 16, 2020, 01:27 PM
Reply #150
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Tonight, I'm going to present a new recipe.
Try to identify the ingredients in the photo below.



What you see is a gratin dauphinois. The potatoes were delicately sliced and grilled in an oven.
Of course, it is garnished with crème fraiche and lightly salted.
We can imagine that Vasudev, shadow.97 and aa1234779, as well as the regular users of the forum are peering down at the bottle of wine.
The Fitou is the first "Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée" wine of Languedoc-Roussillon, which is only produced in nine small communal areas: Fitou, Caves, Treilles, Leucate and La Palme, which are all beside the sea, between Narbonne and Perpignan, and Cascatel, Paziols, Tuchan, and Villeneuve in the Corbières-Massif.
Whilst the region, the climate and the vines enable wines to be produced, which are remarkable for their body and fullness, the enthusiast has the opportunity to discover the nuances which develop as the wines mature. When the fitou is young, we find full-bodied wines with the fragrance of flowers and fruit, rich in noble tanins. Then, beyond two years of age, we encounter wines with a real structure, with a dark, deep colour and a nose with a hint of violet, liquorice, thyme, rosemary and the flowers of the Provençal moorland. These wines are always elegant and deliciously mellow.

November 17, 2020, 02:48 PM
Reply #151
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Tonight, I'm going to present another recipe on the forum.
Look at the photo below and try to identify the main ingredients.
shadow.97, humbert and aa1234779 must be bewildered: what is this blackish beverage?




Well, I'm sure you have identified the vegetables: peas and carrots (petits pois et carottes in French). As for the meat, this is a pork sausage. It's not a Morteau sausage, which would be bigger. This one is called "sausage of Toulouse".

As for the Beverage, you must be thinking that it looks like a famous black soda. Unfortunately, its sweet flavor would ruin the taste of the sausage. What if it was the blackest wine you can find. I guess some users of the forum already know this wine, which is called Cahors.

Cahors red wines are reputedly the darkest in the world; they are also some of the strongest and richest and will keep for years. Cahors has a fascinating but somewhat turbulent history; the vineyards were amongst the first planted in France by the Roman Emperors, more than two thousand years ago and they were an immediate hit. However as the Empire grew it became abundantly clear that production of wheat would need to be stepped up in order to feed the growing masses. France was to be the breadbasket of the Roman Empire and the vines, splendid though they were, would have to go. In the third century one of the more discerning Emperors, Probus, decided that enough was enough and the time had come to reinstate the delicious red wine. He is still a much-celebrated figure in winemaking circles today and one of the distinguished Chateaux of the region has a rather splendid red wine named Prince Probus in his honour.
The great renaissance of Cahors red wine had begun and it was to become one of the most sought after French wines. The Russian Tsars loved it. Peter the Great insisted that the tannic content cured his ulcer and helped his delicate stomach… The Roman Emperors also renewed their interest and even the clergy became alerted to the possibility of a quick, stiff tipple in the communion cup.
Cahors wines are not only the darkest; they are also one of the strongest red wines available. Pope John XXII, a Cahors man, born and bred did much to promote this revival in the fourteenth century and the nearby port of Bordeaux began to take an equally healthy interest.
The Quercy region of France is a land of extreme weather conditions. Summers are very hot and dry, winters are cold and dry, and they can be very cold indeed. In 1956 Mother Nature decided to remind us of this salient fact. The big freeze in February of that fateful year was so bad and so long that once again the vines were virtually wiped out. The only known vineyards to survive are at Clos de Gamot near Prayssac.
The staunch peasants of the region once more set about replanting their vineyards. They used the strong tannic Auxerrois grape as the backbone of their wine, sometimes mixed with a little Merlot or Tannat for more fruity modern tastes. They liked their red wines strong and dark, and they weren’t in the least bothered about unnecessary fripperies like bouquet and fruity flavour.
The French government thought otherwise and in 1971 decided to recognize this black jewel in their non-existent crown by awarding the region AOC status, since then there has been no looking back. There are still only 4,000 hectares laid to vine in the area permitted by AOC standards, which makes Cahors a comparatively rare French wine and is probably why it’s so difficult to find in British shops. The quality however is without doubt the very highest. It still graces the finest restaurant tables and dining rooms in the world.

The harvest in Parnac.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2020, 08:42 PM by scarface »

November 18, 2020, 04:46 PM
Reply #152
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Note that I added some comments in the previous message.

I hope that the users of the forum are fine.
I'm going to try to release a repack of "Visage" by the end of the week.

November 18, 2020, 08:23 PM
Reply #153
I peeked in yesterday and guessed it would be wine, but did not know that it's the darkest in color. Must be bitter too.
Allah knows best.  :)
Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him) said “Surah (chapter of) Hud and its sisters turned my hair gray"

Hud (11)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiqxo4UDVfU

November 18, 2020, 09:02 PM
Reply #154
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I peeked in yesterday and guessed it would be wine, but did not know that it's the darkest in color. Must be bitter too.
Allah knows best.  :)
Well it's 4 am here and I don't sleep, so here is my answer.
The Cahors wine is slightly darker than other wines indeed but we don't see it very clearly on a photo. But Cahors wines are not bitter.
Should there by any bitterness in this wine, it would have ruined the taste of the dish. Can you imagine eating a sausage of Toulouse with a piquette (a mediocre wine)? No you don't (In colloquial language, the French word piquette is derived from the verb "piquer" which means "to sting").

If you are a true wine connoisseur, you certainly prefer Bordeaux wines, they are better known abroad, and it's not easy to pronounce Cahors (maybe you don't know that it is a town).
Those wines are pretty cheap, but for that price they are pretty good.
Here you can find an article about Cahors wines (in French): https://avis-vin.lefigaro.fr/magazine-vin/o120843-cahors-le-vin-noir-n-a-plus-a-rougir
If you want to know the price of this wine, the 75cl bottle of this Cahors wine cost 4 or 5€ I think. Of course I prefer to drink some full-bodied Cotes-du-Rhône like a bottle of Crozes-Hermitage (between 12€ and 20€ per bottle), or a bottle of Chateauneuf-du-Pape (at least 15-20€ per bottle).
« Last Edit: November 18, 2020, 09:39 PM by scarface »

Yesterday at 03:48 AM
Reply #155
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Today, I'm going to present the different steps to prepare a gratin dauphinois.
If humbert, Vasudev, usman or shadow.97 want to impress their guests, the gratin dauphinois is unquestionably a dish that will meet the expectations of the finest connoisseurs.

First and foremost you need some fresh potatoes. For 50 cents of euros, here are some magnificent potatoes.
You can also see some pink radishes. They are are generally eaten as is, with a bit of salt or butter. Served as a starter, they are an ideal appetite suppressant and help limit calories in a meal.


You need to peel and slice the potatoes. Place them in a baking pan and add some crème fraîche.



Then bake the potatoes for 30 minutes at 230 degrees. The gratin dauphinois is ready.