• Welcome to Maher's Digital World.

What kind of meat (or cheese) is it?

Started by scarface, October 11, 2015, 07:02 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

scarface

Tonight, I'm going to show you how to make a good couscous.

Couscous is a North African dish made from tiny steamed balls of semolina flour. Even though we cook it as a grain, couscous is actually a type of pasta. And it’s especially wonderful with stews.

To start, bring the water to a boil in a medium pot. Add a drizzle of olive oil, a pad of butter, and a little salt. Then add, the semolina.
In this picture you can see the balls of semolina flour in the plate.


Next, add the couscous.
Take the pan off the heat, cover, and let the couscous steam for 5 minutes.
When you lift the lid, the grains will appear flat in an even layer. Use a fork to fluff it up and break up the clumps for light and fluffy couscous.


The couscous itself, while tender and light, doesn’t have too much flavor, so it’s customary to serve it with seasonal vegetables and a rich meat broth. you can use lamb shanks for the broth because they contain a lot of flavor and gelatin, which produce a full-bodied broth.

scarface

Tonight, I'm going to present another cheese.

Look carefully at the photo below.
Pay attention to the subtle color of the cheese. And look at the fungal flora on its rind. It is beginning to melt and it smells like feet. This cheese is incredible.



This cheese is called "Tomme de Savoie". Tomme de Savoie is an upland variety of Tomme cheese, specifically, one from Savoy in the French Alps. You can see a map of Savoie below.
The maturing takes around 2-4 months during which the cheese starts to develop a thick grey rind dotted with patches of yellow or red moulding.
Tomme de Savoie dates back to ancient history.





Note that this cheese is banned in the US since the FDA stopped French cheeses like Roquefort, St. Nectaire, Morbier and Tomme de Savoie from coming into the USA.


scarface

Tonight, I'm going to present another recipe.


Look at the photo below.
You can see some pork cutlets, with slices of avocado. There is also a bottle of Cahors red wine. this wine is reputedly the darkest in the world.



If the users of the forum were gathering in the mansion of humbert, this would be a perfect recipe for a barbecue.
Let's imagine the scene. shadow.97 is talking to Maher about his new intel i11. aa1234779 is enjoying his glass of Cahors wine with humbert. I'm preparing the pork cutlets with Vasudev. A Good roasting is an essential component of a good cutlet.

Shadow.97

Had stewed spinach tonight.
One of my favorite dishes, preferably served with Blood pudding, lingonberry and some type of potato.

Didnt feel like making an entire meal, so just had the spinach.

scarface

Tonight, you can see another dish on the table: steamed mussels with white wine and vegetables.


humbert

Quote from: Shadow.97 on July 27, 2021, 03:56 AM
One of my favorite dishes, preferably served with Blood pudding, lingonberry and some type of potato.

Blood pudding? Isn't that something Count Dracula would be interested in? Is it really blood or what?

I love lingonberry. I get it at Ikea, nobody else sells it.

scarface

Quote from: humbert on July 28, 2021, 05:46 AM
Quote from: Shadow.97 on July 27, 2021, 03:56 AM
One of my favorite dishes, preferably served with Blood pudding, lingonberry and some type of potato.

Blood pudding? Isn't that something Count Dracula would be interested in? Is it really blood or what?

I love lingonberry. I get it at Ikea, nobody else sells it.

I'd be glad if shadow.97 could enlighten us about this Swedish delicacy indeed.
Maybe you could give us detailed precisions about the blood used in this pudding, and its difference with its French counterpart, the black boudin too.
I guess humbert would also want to know if this Swedish medieval dish can be found in San Antonio or in Texas, or whether he can find other "blood-based products".

humbert

Quote from: scarface on July 30, 2021, 12:18 AM
I guess humbert would also want to know if this Swedish medieval dish can be found in San Antonio or in Texas, or whether he can find other "blood-based products".

If I asked for blood pudding, everyone would think I'm either a cannibal or a vampire.  :)  At Ikea they don't sell anything that even remotely looks like that. I wonder what it tastes like.

scarface

#208
Tonight, I'm going to show you another recipe.

Look at the photo below and try to identify the various ingredients of this dish.



We have seen that humbert was interested in the blood pudding. That’s why I took the opportunity to make a recipe with curry rice and a “boudin noir”. Maybe Shadow.97 prefers the appearance of the Swedish blood pudding, which is a traditional Swedish dish made of pig blood that is mixed with flour, beer or svagdricka.
When Foreigners think about Sweden they probably think about smoked salmon, or cinnamon buns and not about the “Blodpudding” which is a very popular and common food eaten for lunch or dinner in Sweden.
Actually, In France boudin sausage is less popular. It is very cheap. The Anglo-Norman word boudin meant 'sausage', 'blood sausage' or 'entrails' in general.
Therefore, black puddings, blood sausages, or boudins noirs in French, properly so called, are pretty similar since they are made from pig's blood. The French boudin is also made of fat and cooked onions. They were made from the earliest times. The techniques and ingredients used in its composition are today numerous and vary according to the different local customs and traditions. Unlike black boudin, white boudin is made of poultry.

I guess that humbert might be a bit flabbergasted. Blood sausage is not a common recipe in the United States. However if he wants to taste this, a local market in San Antonio, called “Sasha's European Market” may be selling this.

Note that you can also find the correct pronunciation of the word “boudin” here (if you want to show the shopkeeper that you are a connoisseur who only accepts French products): https://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais/boudin/10430
If you want to impress your interlocutor, you can say “je voudrais un boudin aux oignons” (in my opinion it’s better with onions).

I imagine that Maher and aa1234779 must find this a bit disgusting. I know that pork meat is forbidden in certain religions. And I could tell aa1234779 that I’m not a big fan of Boudin. Actually, duck confit and smoked salmon are probably more refined dishes. If the photo of the pig was on the package, it would certainly act as a deterrent.


I'm adding another photo to show the texture of the blood sausage to humbert, once the skin is removed.
Here you can see the pig’s blood, pork grease, and onions. Sometimes they are mixed together with spices, condiments, wine, chestnuts, and chard, depending on the country or region. Blood serves as a spectacular food binder, much like egg whites, giving the sausage its smooth texture. The sausage mixture is then stuffed into pig's intestines. The sausage skin can be eaten, but it's not very good...

scarface

Today, I'm going to show you another dish.

Look at the photo below.



Here you can see a pizza cooked in wood-fired oven. Maybe you have noticed that something is wrong. There is some soda on the table. This is a glass of "puma cola". Drinking beverages with as much sugar must must be the exception and not the norm.