Author Topic: Financial news and stock markets.  (Read 81907 times)

January 31, 2016, 10:12 AM
Reply #80

Tonight, I ate at a Pakistani restaurant, and I chose some chicken pakora and some tika masala Shrimps with rice. Certainly usmangujjar and vasudev are familiar with that food.
Today I had some tikka masala too. One more thing, exam results are yet to come, some of them being poor to worse performance. only time will tell and will it re-spawn another tale is yet to know.
My exam grades just came back, I'm very satisfied with having 75% B or higher.  ::) Mainly because I never do homework, and I mainly just do nothing at lessons, I just improvise during exams.. Well it has worked for me, and is a great way to decrease stress in life. Swedish school is a joke nowdays. Sadly..

Talking about Finance, do you believe you could live a life with little to no income? I mean, after you get a house, and the necessities such as a well, farm, tools, etc.
I've been starting to look more and more into it, and I see a way of doing it, by actually having your house as a job, i.e small-scale farming.. A dream of mine is to be fully self-sufficient.. Thought, I wish I had someone to do it together with, because it would make it all a hell lot easier.
The things that worry me the most if I do actually manage to get a house etc in not the far distant future, is: (if I want to be self-sufficient)..
Heat?
Power by windmill and tesla-like wall battery?
What to do during winters, and how would I make myself, and i.e animals, crops survive..
.. Internet is most likely no issue, I'll just buy some huge *** antenna and steal someone's wifi and expect 0.01 mbit.  ::) No, not really. but well, internet is no necessity as long as you have a small database with information.

January 31, 2016, 11:18 AM
Reply #81
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Tonight, I ate at a Pakistani restaurant, and I chose some chicken pakora and some tika masala Shrimps with rice. Certainly usmangujjar and vasudev are familiar with that food.
Today I had some tikka masala too. One more thing, exam results are yet to come, some of them being poor to worse performance. only time will tell and will it re-spawn another tale is yet to know.
My exam grades just came back, I'm very satisfied with having 75% B or higher.  ::) Mainly because I never do homework, and I mainly just do nothing at lessons, I just improvise during exams.. Well it has worked for me, and is a great way to decrease stress in life. Swedish school is a joke nowdays. Sadly..

Talking about Finance, do you believe you could live a life with little to no income? I mean, after you get a house, and the necessities such as a well, farm, tools, etc.
I've been starting to look more and more into it, and I see a way of doing it, by actually having your house as a job, i.e small-scale farming.. A dream of mine is to be fully self-sufficient.. Thought, I wish I had someone to do it together with, because it would make it all a hell lot easier.
The things that worry me the most if I do actually manage to get a house etc in not the far distant future, is: (if I want to be self-sufficient)..
Heat?
Power by windmill and tesla-like wall battery?
What to do during winters, and how would I make myself, and i.e animals, crops survive..
.. Internet is most likely no issue, I'll just buy some huge *** antenna and steal someone's wifi and expect 0.01 mbit.  ::) No, not really. but well, internet is no necessity as long as you have a small database with information.
Even I scored 60% in bachelors.

January 31, 2016, 02:13 PM
Reply #82
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Quote
Talking about Finance, do you believe you could live a life with little to no income? I mean, after you get a house, and the necessities such as a well, farm, tools, etc.
I've been starting to look more and more into it, and I see a way of doing it, by actually having your house as a job, i.e small-scale farming.. A dream of mine is to be fully self-sufficient.. Thought, I wish I had someone to do it together with, because it would make it all a hell lot easier.
The things that worry me the most if I do actually manage to get a house etc in not the far distant future, is: (if I want to be self-sufficient)..
Heat?
Power by windmill and tesla-like wall battery?
What to do during winters, and how would I make myself, and i.e animals, crops survive..


Perhaps you can live with little income if you are self sufficient for food, for example you can have a hen-house, a vegetable garden, but it means you live in a farm. If you have no other ways to earn money that implies you are selling a part of the food output to be able to buy water, grains of wheat for the chickens, and pay for recurring bills...

As for electricity, a windmill is very expensive, but maybe you can afford some solar panels on a roof, for at least 10000-15000 euros. My father has been using a solar system on his roof for years, and it’s working, but the electricity is sold because this electricity is subsidized, and otherwise he would not be self sufficient.




« Last Edit: April 07, 2019, 11:26 AM by scarface »

February 02, 2016, 05:29 AM
Reply #83
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Today, the cac 40 is currently losing 1.8% and the dax 1.1%

In fact, S&P downgraded Shell, and sees a significant likelihood of downgrades for several Europe-based integrated oil and gas majors in the next weeks.
"We now believe many major oil and gas companies' current and prospective core debt coverage metrics are likely to remain below our rating guidelines for two or three years as the industry adjusts to lower prices," S&P analysts said in the report.
a link for the cac40: http://www.boursorama.com/bourse/
a link for the dax: http://www.investing.com/indices/germany-30
a link for the dow jones: http://www.investing.com/indices/us-30
« Last Edit: February 02, 2016, 04:43 PM by scarface »

February 08, 2016, 10:38 AM
Reply #84
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Deutsche bank really worries me.

Its share has lost more than 30 % in a month. It lost 10+% today.

February 08, 2016, 01:43 PM
Reply #85
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Quote
Deutsche bank really worries me.

Its share has lost more than 30 % in a month. It lost 10+% today.

That's right harkaz, -38% since 1 January, it's quite a big dive. I bought some shares of Deutsche bank in 2014 at 24 euros per share, and I sold a little above, at 26 euros if I remember well. But even at this time Deutsche Bank was not really healthy. A few months before they had made a capital increase to wipe out losses.
A few days ago I was wondering if buying some stocks of Deutsche bank would be a good bet, this time...at 15 euros per share. But the fall in its stock prices was not unjustified, since they announced heavy losses, roughly 7 billion euros, I think. Instead, I bought some Credit agricole. It was not a good idea either. Well I invested a "small sum", not more than 2% of my capital. In fact, I think that the markets will keep sliding in the next few weeks. But contrary to Deutsche Bank, Credit Agricole is still paying a dividend, for the moment.


I listened to BFM 2 hours ago, a radio dedicated to financial markets, and they talked about Deutsche Bank. They also talked about the fall in stock markets. While the cac 40 and dax 30 plunged by more than 3%, the Athens stock exchange crumbled by 8%...
They said that the investors were massively selling, to look to safe-heavens such as government bonds or gold.

On this forum, we have seen that everyday some people are registering, they certainly enjoy the forum content and its participants, even if the forum if less lively than before due to the lack of time of certain users. They can ask some questions in this thread if they want.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2019, 05:38 PM by scarface »

February 11, 2016, 05:39 AM
Reply #86
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We are the champions! Followed by big players like China, Germany and Japan.
Also in the group: Nigeria & Ukraine

Greece also suffers from a refugee crisis and this will only get worse.
We must be the most unstable country in the world right now.

February 11, 2016, 10:57 AM
Reply #87
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To harkaz: The world is going through a serious crisis and I don't think Greece is the worst country. But Greeks are also a bit responsible for what's happening: the lack of reforms and corruption are undermining Greece.
As for the refugee crisis, Well, 5 million Syrians have already left their country and there are still 10 million Syrians who are going to leave in the next weeks. It will be over soon, when Assad and Baghdadi are both alone in Syria.

Finally, the cac 40 plunged by 4,05% and the dax fell 2.90%. The Dow Jones is currently dropping more than 2%.

PS: I sent Ahmad a message to tell him some people on the forum are waiting for some news.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2016, 11:06 AM by scarface »

February 11, 2016, 03:42 PM
Reply #88
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Certainly I need to rephrase it. We are not yet unstable. The risk is extreme however.

The problem with the refugees is currently financial; apart from the costs of supporting them there is the decline of tourism - the number one source of income for Greece.
But if a handful of terrorists among them decide to destabilize the country, the problem will become much greater.


Plus, there is the certainty of social unrest after a potential bail-in in Greece banks, which will lead to loss of deposits.

At the moment, relatively few people in Greece seem to fully realize the gravity of the situation.
And yes, you're right we're responsible for many things. The most important mistake, however, happened in 2010, when the Greek authorities decided not to default, in order to prevent something we will not prevent anyway: loss of deposits and grexit.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2016, 03:47 PM by harkaz »

February 14, 2016, 07:51 AM
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Tonight, I’m going to hold an exceptional conference. For the investors of the forum, I’m going to talk about a real opportunity in Palestine.

A miracle comes out of the ground. Slowly, painfully, in the din and dust. The obstacles are numerous, the adverse winds powerful (I was wondering if my ellipse was correct here?). But stone by stone, Rawabi ceases to be just an architectural blueprint with a perfect geometry or a layout for visitors. Rawabi exists. And it confirms, after many years, its revolutionary destiny: to become the first modern Palestinian city, designed and built to serve its occupants. It will sweep aside many long-held beliefs on the Palestinian territories, according to which the only comfortable living areas are settlements, irrigated by the Israeli public money.

It is also necessary that some people come to Rawabi. The occupants are trickling in, while cranes and workers are busy on this enormous project, located nine kilometers north of Ramallah, the capital of the West Bank.

On a nearby hill, Jewish inhabitants of the Ateret settlement observe developments with concern. Three times, mysterious hands tore the large Palestinian flag floating atop Rawabi. For now, two neighborhoods on the twenty-three that count the city are already operational. The center, built in the shape of letter Q - as Qatar, the main funder, through the company Qatari Diar - will house shops, restaurants, cinemas, conference rooms, and space for young entrepreneurs.
A dream of a middle class. Everything is eco-friendly and accessible for the disabled. No satellite dishes or water tanks on roofs, as elsewhere in the Palestinian territories. The used water is treated in a specially built factory, power cables and fiber optics buried. Rawabi hopes to become an incubator for start-up, inspired by the extraordinary Israeli successes in this area. There is a mosque, a Greek Orthodox church and a Roman amphitheater deviation of 15 000 seats, adjoining sports fields. The dream would be to see  the greatest Arabic artists in this majestic setting.
On clear days, it seems that one can distinguish the sea in the distance, and the contours of Tel Aviv. A fully equipped medical center will come out of the ground. A town hall will host the first town councilor. Three schools are also planned, but their construction has been delayed for lack of funds. They are due to open in September 2016. Total cost of Rawabi, at this hour: 1.2 billion $, against 850 million originally planned.


Cleanliness is impeccable, walkways do not resound with children’s shouts. It will take a few months before the first stores - grocery and pharmacy - enable residents to obtain fresh supplies. None of this has deterred the Al-Gabareen family. Raga, 30, and her husband, Mohammed, 34, complete the unpacking  of the boxes. The hotplates are not yet set, so they temporarily installed a gas tank and a stove in the kitchen. The family lived in Al-Bireh, near Ramallah, on a busy street, no garden or lift. Here they marvel at their new surroundings, 190 square meters smelling fresh paint and new leather. Until  some buddies appear in the staircase, the children are glued in front of a big TV showing cartoons. "Right now, we're the only ones living in the building, it's weird but very relaxing, said Raga. Families come to us for advice before moving. "

Manager in an advertising agency, she explains their approach. "Rawabi is a smart city, all facilities are planned in advance, she said. I want my children to grow in a secure and ecological environment. "The couple bought the apartment for 126,000 dollars. they paid 15% of the contracted amount and took out bank loan with a 4.75% interest rate. Prestigious foreign visitors who came here have necessarily been impressed. They also wondered if there were enough Palestinians with comfortable incomes to be able to make such an investment.


To date, 650 apartments were sold. Once completed, Rawabi will count 6 000 flats. Candidates are attracted by both the comfort and modern facilities offered by the space, but also by price. "It is 25% cheaper than Nablus, or Ramallah, said Amir Dajani, deputy manager of the site. We want to capitalize on the young and educated population, thanks to the nearby Beir Zeit University. "Among the buyers, there are Christians, people living in Israel or Palestinians living abroad, wishing to invest in a future project. But the developer is careful not to turn Rawabi into a desert city.
Bashar Masri is not tired of observing the first removal trucks entering Rawabi. Aged 54, the owner of Massar International is one of the richest Palestinian entrepreneurs. He made his fortune in real estate projects in the Middle East and North Africa. On the wall, a map of the city, which looks like a beetle. "This is the largest project in Palestinian history, he said. My vision is not Rawabi, but the domino effect it will cause. The lack of housing in the West Bank amounts to 200 000 units. We are building here in 6 000. I believe that a Palestinian state is in the making, but it will require decades. The issue is not that the Israeli occupation will end one day. It's certain. The question is: what will be the nature of our state? What healthy economy? "
Bashar Masri is an enduring visionary. He has been obsessed with Rawabi since 2007. The biggest problem yet to solve is the road. A single access, narrow road allows to reach Rawabi. The city is located in Area A, under control of the Palestinian Authority. But building a wide, multi-lane road, which would reach Ramallah in 10 minutes through Area C, requires the agreement of the Israeli administration. "They will perhaps accept, sighs Mr. Masri. But the devil is in the details. Suddenly, they ask for an environmental impact study and another one one the traffic expected ... "
Masri did everything to politicize Rawabi, so as not to become hostage to the conflict. Since Palestinian officials themselves are both unable to perceive the symbolic power of the project, and not much interested in it, the contractor went on his way, alone. "The Authority [PA] has given us a moral and political support, but without investing a single penny. They should, through tax collection, install electricity, police station, fire station, access roads! "
Before the new wave of violence, in October, he had observed a renewed interest in his new city. Since, the restrictions reinforced by Israel on travel have slowed the construction site, including the movement of workers from Hebron's southernmost territory. Some contractors have even decided to rent their apartments, near Rawabi.
For several years, Mr. Masri has been criticized, envied. He has been criticized, at first, for expropriating the inhabitants of twelve villages around, of which a part of the land was bought. Then for acquiring building materials in Israel and thus stimulating the economy of the occupant. "Some considered that Rawabi endorsed the occupation, since everything was done through discussions with Israelis, said a member of the executive committee of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO). But if you do something to protect our land, it is positive in the end. "So," collaborator "rather than resistant, Bashar Masri? "I hate the settlements, but I will not give the hilltops to these people breaks off the businessman. I prefer ignoring that passenger emotional resentment. "


« Last Edit: January 01, 2020, 10:08 AM by scarface »