New topic Photos

Started by scarface, February 01, 2015, 03:10 PM

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scarface

#420
Tonight, I'm going to hold a conference to present a few photos for the users of the forum.
In the previous version of the forum it was possible to click on the photos to enlarge them, but it appears it doesn't work anymore. So if you want to see a larger version of the photos, I advise you to open them in new tabs.

Here you can see a photo taken from the Mirabeau bridge in the 16th arrondissement of Paris.
You can see the Eiffel tower in the middle of the photo. You can also see the red Novotel tower and on its left, the Totem tower, which was described as a "gigantic concrete morel" in the book Serotonin of Houellebecq.



A few photos taken on the Champs Elysées. Humbert will probably notice the premises of the Mcdonald.




On the avenue de Wagram




No trip to Paris is complete without a visit to the Latin Quarter in the 6th and 5th arrondissement, on the Left Bank. The area's many cafés and restaurants are laid-back and welcoming; they are filled with Parisians, students and tourists. There are several attractions to visit, among them the Pantheon, the Musée National du Moyen-Âge and the Luxembourg gardens. As you stroll through the district you will also come across the Sorbonne, the best known university in Paris, the Lycée Henri IV, the shopping streets Rue Mouffetard and Rue Monge and the charming Place de la Contrescarpe. The district also has popular show venues like the Paradis Latin, the Théâtre de l'Odéon and the Caveau de la Huchette.

The Odeon - Théâtre de l'Europe, in the 6th arrondissement, is the oldest theater-monument in Europe to still operate in its original premises



Here, on the Boulevard St Michel, you can see the railings of the jardin du Luxembourg in the background, located in the 6th arrondissement. The name Luxembourg comes from the Latin Mons Lucotitius, the name of the hill where the garden is located.



Here you can see the medici fountain, a monumental fountain in the Jardin du Luxembourg. It was designed like a grotto reminiscent of one in the Boboli Gardens in Italy where Marie de Medici grew up, and she had this commissioned for the Jardin du Luxembourg  in 1630.



The Senate, in the jardin du Luxembourg.



In the jardin du Luxembourg. In the background, you can see the Montparnasse Tower.







In the background you can see the Pantheon



In the rue Vaugirard, a good Vietnamese restaurant. It's a bit expensive but the nems are excellent.



A bit further, the museum of Cluny in the 5th arrondissement.


The Fontaine Saint-Michel, a monumental fountain located in Place Saint-Michel in the 6th arrondissement.





The cathedral Notre Dame de Paris, in the 4th arrondissement.



Some souvenirs, in the shops bordering the banks of the Seine.




humbert

Quote from: scarface on May 08, 2022, 09:59 PMA few photos taken on the Champs Elysées. Humbert will probably notice the premises of the Mcdonald.

The picture of the Arc d'Triomphe -- is that the side that faces McDonald's or the side that faces away from McDonald's? I don't remember the details.


scarface

#422
Quote from: humbert on May 09, 2022, 02:54 AMThe picture of the Arc d'Triomphe -- is that the side that faces McDonald's or the side that faces away from McDonald's? I don't remember the details.
Actually, here you see the north face of the arch of triumph, so this is not the side that you see on the avenue of the Champs Elysées, which is on the left on the photo. By the way, this photo could have only been taken from the north since the Eiffel tower is located on the south of the arc of triumph. To be specific, it was taken at the beginning of the Avenue de Wagram (exact location here: https://www.google.com/maps/@48.8744869,2.2954349,3a,75y,172.72h,89.92t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s1umhb_YyNV0Va1i2v4BIAg!2e0!7i16384!8i8192)
From the Avenue Mac-Mahon, just beside the avenue de Wagram, you can get a three quarter perspective of the monument, which is more spectacular, but then the arch is hiding the Eiffel tower.

humbert

I was looking at your link. After doing some searching I found the McDonald's which is, sure enough, on the other side of the Arc from where you took the picture. I remember it was located on the left side of the street facing away from the Arc. This made it easy to find.

Let me ask: atop the businesses that operate on the Champs Elysées appear to be located at the bottom of a building several floors high with windows. Do people live there? If so, then how do they get in and out of their homes?

scarface

#424
Quote from: humbert on May 11, 2022, 02:44 AMLet me ask: atop the businesses that operate on the Champs Elysées appear to be located at the bottom of a building several floors high with windows. Do people live there? If so, then how do they get in and out of their homes?
Generally there are shops or restaurants on the first floor of the buildings of the Champs Elysées (Note that in French, the first floor is the "rez-de chaussée", the "premier étage" (literally first floor) being the second floor for the English speakers).
I guess there are many (too many) offices in the higher floors. There are certainly a few apartments too. If you are referring to the location of the Mcdo, it seems there is a door located on the left. Check this photo: https://previews.123rf.com/images/moovstock/moovstock1701/moovstock170100389/68768132-paris-france-december-31-2016-mcdonalds-restaurant-on-famous-french-champs-elysees-street.jpg


scarface

Some of you have been interested in the photos of the weeping blue cedar, a huge tree of the Arboretum of Châtenay-Malabry.
So a video was added in this message:
https://www.nomaher.com/forum/index.php?topic=2283.msg37509#msg37509

scarface

Tonight, I'm posting a few more photos. I thought they were useless but Humbert showed a strong interest in the last photos posted in this topic and I guess that some users will look at them carefully.


On the Boulevard Saint Germain, a major street in Paris on the Rive Gauche of the Seine. It curves in a 3.5-kilometre (2.1 miles) arc from the Pont de Sully in the east (the bridge at the edge of Île Saint-Louis) to the Pont de la Concorde (the bridge to the Place de la Concorde) in the west and traverses the 5th, 6th and 7th arrondissements. At its midpoint, the boulevard is traversed by the north-south Boulevard Saint-Michel. The boulevard is most famous for crossing the Saint-Germain-des-Prés neighborhood from which it derives its name.
Note that apparently there is a man lying on the floor in front of the bank.



In the rue de l'ancienne comédie, in the 6th arrondissement. In case humbert or shadow.97 want to buy a flat here, they have to know that the real estate of this arrondissement is the most expensive of Paris.
On the right you can see the famous café Procope, the oldest café of Paris.
Throughout the 18th century, the brasserie Procope was the meeting place of the intellectual establishment like Voltaire, Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson.
5 or 6 years ago, I came here with my father to drink a coffee, and I remember that it wasn't the regular price for a coffee, but at least you are received in a unique setting.



The Panthéon



Another photo of the cathédrale Notre Dame.



A photo of the "rue du chat qui pêche", literally street of the fishing cat, the narrowest street of Paris, in the 5th arrondissement.



A photo of the arc de triumph as seen from the south sidewalk of the Champs Elysées.


humbert

Quote from: scarface on May 11, 2022, 12:07 PMI guess there are many (too many) offices in the higher floors. There are certainly a few apartments too. If you are referring to the location of the Mcdo, it seems there is a door located on the left.

So those windows on the 2nd floor and higher are both offices and apartments. How do you get up there? Are there doors somewhere on the 1st floor with access to stairways or elevators?

Who in their right mind would want to live in one of those apartments on the Champs-Élysées? Not only is it notoriously expensive but the street noise must be intolerable.

With respect to McDonald's, unless my memory fails me there was second floor (this was Nov 2007). We walked in from the street and right there was the front counter. There was no place to eat. We had to sit down in the middle of the Champs-Élysées to swallow a hamburger. BTW, judging how the people are dressed, you must have taken this picture some time during the past winter.

scarface

Quote from: humbert on May 13, 2022, 02:53 AMSo those windows on the 2nd floor and higher are both offices and apartments. How do you get up there? Are there doors somewhere on the 1st floor with access to stairways or elevators?
I think there are doors somewhere indeed. For the stairways or elevators, I think you replied to your own question. If you're a bird you can easily go to the upper floors with your wings but if you're a mere man, it doesn't work.


Quote from: humbert on May 13, 2022, 02:53 AMWho in their right mind would want to live in one of those apartments on the Champs-Élysées? Not only is it notoriously expensive but the street noise must be intolerable.
You're certainly right. And If the avenue of the Champs Elysées is Europe's most expensive retail location, and one of the most expensive in the world after the 5th avenue in New York, for the real estate prices it's not the most expensive street. In Paris, the most expensive street is the avenue Montaigne (which adjoins the Champs Elysées). Probably a perfect place for the would-be starlets.
I think the 6th and 7th arrondissement are the most expensive (the 19th and the 20th being the least expensive).


Quote from: humbert on May 13, 2022, 02:53 AMWith respect to McDonald's, unless my memory fails me there was second floor (this was Nov 2007). We walked in from the street and right there was the front counter. There was no place to eat. We had to sit down in the middle of the Champs-Élysées to swallow a hamburger. BTW, judging how the people are dressed, you must have taken this picture some time during the past winter.
Actually I didn't take this photo, I found it...
As for the date of the photos, the URL shows it was taken on December the 31st 2016.

scarface

#429
Today, I went to the Meudon observatory park.
The heights of Meudon have always been noted for their beauty. French style gardens and royal hunting grounds in the past, they enclose today an outstanding and protected biodiversity.

When Servien, superintendent of finances and baron of Meudon, bought the château perched above Meudon, in 1655, there was no park. He spent his fortune to buy the land, to create the large terrace held up by the magnificent wall which can still be seen today, to lay out the paths, to dig out the pools, right up to his death four year later.

Enamoured by the marvellous gardens, by the magnificent layout, by the effects induced by the changes in height and by the view of Paris, Louis XIV bought the domain for his son in 1695. He planted tens of thousands of flowers and 8000 chestnut trees. The forest of Meudon, traversed by alleyways wide enough for horse-drawn carriages, became a place where the Court could go and hunt.

After the death of Louis XIV, the Royal domain was increasingly neglected. Louis XV and Louis XVI used it for hunting. The latter sold the lower gardens to the peasants. To separate the pleasure gardens from the hunting grounds, he built a wall, which is still there, and destroyed the water reservoirs and pools.
After 1800 the domain was divided up. Napoleon bought a part of the grounds ; he tore out the boxwood hedges and the old arbours so that his troops could parade on the large terrace.

In 1876 a part of the domain was given to the astronomer Janssen to create an observatory. In 1913 the domain was classed as a historical monument and registered as a protected site in 1930. This classification ensures the conservation of monuments and sites. In spite of the damage caused by the storms in 1990 and 1999, the forest still has a large number of very large trees, a significant variety of species, and is home to a large population of birds and insects.


This photo was taken from a terrace of the park of Meudon. There is already a photo taken in this park and posted a few months ago, but the quality of this one is better: it was taken with a Samsung s21 FE. What's more, the sky is unusually bright.


Here you can see a second shot with a zoom x3. And this is a sharp photo. The photo with the s6 would have been certainly blurry with such a zoom.
This photo was taken from the southwest of Paris and yet you can clearly see the Pleyel tower in Saint Denis on the left, or the twin towers Les Mercuriales in Bagnolet on the right, whose architecture was inspired by the twin towers of the former World Trade Center.